Book Now

Canal Number C-110

Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Canal Number C-110 ends in Homestead, Florida.

3 feet (1 meters)

4.23 miles long (6.80 kilometers)

About The Canal Number C-110

About Canal Number C-110, Florida

Canal Number C-110 is a canal in Miami-Dade County in Florida. It has an elevation of 1 meter and is situated northwest of United States Highway Canal Number C-109. It is one of the numerous canals running through South Florida and part of the state’s world-famous canal fishing. Cypress Creek, Parkline, and Snake Creek are some other canals you can find on this side of the state.

Canal Number C-110 Fishing Description

About Fishing in Canal Number C-110, Florida

Canal Number C-110 features a diverse range of fish species. One of the most popular ones to catch here is the butterfly peacock, also known as peacock bass. Peacock bass are best caught during daytime, particularly in shaded spots near bridges and culverts. The place offers access via a canal bank, but riding a boat is also an option. Peacock bass are very active in spots with fallen trees, canal ends, intersections, drop-offs, lily pads, and other structures. Most anglers agree that live bait is the simplest way to catch them. A golden shiner of about three inches in length is a popular bait option.

Another species present in the canal is largemouth bass. For many anglers, this species is also a prized catch for its large size. Florida's largemouth bass are larger than the general population, making the state a favorite destination for anglers all over the world. They’re also called the “tackle buster,” because they willingly bite almost any time, whether you’ve thrown live bait or artificial lures. When fishing largemouth bass, keep in mind that they are typically located near cover such as grass, rock, wood, and lily pads because it allows them to hide better when stalking their prey.

Midas cichlids are another popular catch in Miami-Dade canal systems. Sometimes referred to as the “red devil cichlid,” they are commonly spotted taking cover in submerged logs and vegetation. It’s important to remember that this species has small mouths, so small hooks work better. Although live bait is a more popular option, artificial lures also succeed in getting them to bite.

To keep its species and anglers safe, the state of Florida has set various rules and regulations. Make sure to familiarize yourself with these, as well as with the licenses and permits. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is the regulatory body in Florida.

Canal Number C-110 Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Peacock bass fishing happens in Canal Number C-110 all year long. Florida is hailed to be one of the prime spots for chasing this species, so no matter which month you go, you have a high chance of success. However, between March and June and September and December are said to be the peak seasons. During these times, anglers typically catch their prized peacock bass, most of which are heavier than four pounds. Largemouth bass are also available all throughout the year, but spring is the best time to hunt one.  Largemouth bass are best fished on cloudy or overcast days because the lack of sunlight makes them more willing to swim out of cover.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Peacock bass fishing happens in Canal Number C-110 all year long. Florida is hailed to be one of the prime spots for chasing this species, so no matter which month you go, you have a high chance of success. However, between March and June and September and December are said to be the peak seasons. During these times, anglers typically catch their prized peacock bass, most of which are heavier than four pounds. Largemouth bass are also available all throughout the year, but spring is the best time to hunt one.  Largemouth bass are best fished on cloudy or overcast days because the lack of sunlight makes them more willing to swim out of cover.

Canal Number C-110 Fish Species

About Fishing in Canal Number C-110, Florida

Canal Number C-110 features a diverse range of fish species. One of the most popular ones to catch here is the butterfly peacock, also known as peacock bass. Peacock bass are best caught during daytime, particularly in shaded spots near bridges and culverts. The place offers access via a canal bank, but riding a boat is also an option. Peacock bass are very active in spots with fallen trees, canal ends, intersections, drop-offs, lily pads, and other structures. Most anglers agree that live bait is the simplest way to catch them. A golden shiner of about three inches in length is a popular bait option.

Another species present in the canal is largemouth bass. For many anglers, this species is also a prized catch for its large size. Florida's largemouth bass are larger than the general population, making the state a favorite destination for anglers all over the world. They’re also called the “tackle buster,” because they willingly bite almost any time, whether you’ve thrown live bait or artificial lures. When fishing largemouth bass, keep in mind that they are typically located near cover such as grass, rock, wood, and lily pads because it allows them to hide better when stalking their prey.

Midas cichlids are another popular catch in Miami-Dade canal systems. Sometimes referred to as the “red devil cichlid,” they are commonly spotted taking cover in submerged logs and vegetation. It’s important to remember that this species has small mouths, so small hooks work better. Although live bait is a more popular option, artificial lures also succeed in getting them to bite.

To keep its species and anglers safe, the state of Florida has set various rules and regulations. Make sure to familiarize yourself with these, as well as with the licenses and permits. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is the regulatory body in Florida.

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Peacock Bass

Habitat: River, Lake, Canal

Weight: 3 - 15 Pounds

Length: 10" - 29"

Black Drum

Habitat: Brackish Waters, Onshore

Weight: 15 - 90 Pounds

Length: 0" - "

Alligator Gar

Habitat: Inland, Nearshore

Weight: 100 - 160 Pounds

Length: 48" - 120"