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Crow Creek

Alameda County, California.

Crow Creek midpoint in San Ramon, California.

Crow Creek ends in Hayward, California.

171 feet (52 meters)

8.51 miles long (13.70 kilometers)

About The Crow Creek

About Crow Creek, CA

Crow Creek is a river found in Alameda county. It specifically runs through Castro Valley.

Classified as a watershed, the creek’s waters start to flow just north of the Norris Canyon Estates where it flows downward and immediately joins up with Bolinas Creek. It continues south before merging with Norris Creek and going further down. It reaches Castro Valley where at the heart of the city, forms the San Lorenzo Creek and heads west until the water exits the mouth of the creek and into San Francisco Bay.

The creek is predominantly found in Castro Valley, one of the many cities in Northern California, and is near San Francisco. Before European immigrants settled in the area, it was first inhabited by the Chocheño, Ohlone Native Americans. In 1797, Spanish missionaries established the area as part of their colony. Much of the area was granted to Don Guillermo Castro of which Castro Valley is named after. The land grant included Hayward, Castro Valley, and the Crow, Cull, and Palomares Canyons. He was also an infamous gambler that over the course of his life saw him sell land in order to pay debt.

Crow Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Crow Creek, CA

From the rural areas up north by the Norris Canyon Estates to the more urban Castro Valley, there are sure to be many opportunities for game fishing anglers. Most anglers will likely find the following fish: bass (largemouth and smallmouth), channel catfish, and redear sunfish.

Trying to catch channel catfish can be simple. These fish have sensitive noses which is why anglers use strong smelling bait like stinkbait and cheese. Other anglers also use minnows and worms. Anglers should also prepare longer rods from 7” to 7.6” as its length helps when implementing different fishing techniques like pitching or flipping.  It is also good to take note that most catfish have hard mouths and skulls. When preparing hooks, it is best to use sharper treble hooks in order to lessen the chances of catfish escaping. 

Bass are one of the most common fish found in American waters that’s why it’s a popular game fish for anglers. Both largemouth and smallmouth bass can put up a tough fight. The smallmouth bass weigh around 1-4 lbs and largemouth are on the heavier side, weighing up to 20 lbs or more. Fly fishing is the most common method when trying to reel in the smallmouth bass. Most anglers use a 6 to 8-weight rod due to their strength. The use of a longer rod, around 8 ½ ft to 9 ft. is recommended. Equipment for largemouth bass fishing is typically the same. As the fish is on the heavier side, using an 8-weight would do the job. Using a disk drag will also help as it gives anglers a more gradual resistance in the line with a sinking leader. When preparing bait, both bass are receptive to the use of minnows, plugs, worms, and jerk bait. The difference between the two fish are in where they’re more likely to be found. Smallmouth bass are mostly found in open waters during warm temperatures while largemouth bass are mostly found in muddy waters, underneath fallen trees and weeds. 

Redear sunfish are one of the easier fish caught in Crow Creek and are more commonly used by anglers to practice using baits. What’s difficult in trying to catch the sunfish is trying to locate one. Redear sunfish are bottom-dwellers that swim around in vegetation. Most anglers let their flies sink into the bottom of the water before reeling it in for a few seconds until waiting for the fish to take the bait. Most anglers recommend the use of a  7-9 foot 5 weight rod with an 8-foot leader attached to 4 feet of 12 lbs mono. It is also recommended to use a size #6 or #8 flies like triangle bugs, poppers, or bucktails with the use of nightcrawlers, worms, and leeches as bait.

Crow Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality 

Anglers looking to fish in Crow Creek will be pleased to know that most fish are in season all year long. Both the smallmouth bass and the channel catfish are more active during colder temperatures. Early spring is a good time to catch smallmouth bass. Largemouth bass redear sunfish are best caught during the end of spring after their spawning season and during the months of summer. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality 

Anglers looking to fish in Crow Creek will be pleased to know that most fish are in season all year long. Both the smallmouth bass and the channel catfish are more active during colder temperatures. Early spring is a good time to catch smallmouth bass. Largemouth bass redear sunfish are best caught during the end of spring after their spawning season and during the months of summer. 

Crow Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Crow Creek, CA

From the rural areas up north by the Norris Canyon Estates to the more urban Castro Valley, there are sure to be many opportunities for game fishing anglers. Most anglers will likely find the following fish: bass (largemouth and smallmouth), channel catfish, and redear sunfish.

Trying to catch channel catfish can be simple. These fish have sensitive noses which is why anglers use strong smelling bait like stinkbait and cheese. Other anglers also use minnows and worms. Anglers should also prepare longer rods from 7” to 7.6” as its length helps when implementing different fishing techniques like pitching or flipping.  It is also good to take note that most catfish have hard mouths and skulls. When preparing hooks, it is best to use sharper treble hooks in order to lessen the chances of catfish escaping. 

Bass are one of the most common fish found in American waters that’s why it’s a popular game fish for anglers. Both largemouth and smallmouth bass can put up a tough fight. The smallmouth bass weigh around 1-4 lbs and largemouth are on the heavier side, weighing up to 20 lbs or more. Fly fishing is the most common method when trying to reel in the smallmouth bass. Most anglers use a 6 to 8-weight rod due to their strength. The use of a longer rod, around 8 ½ ft to 9 ft. is recommended. Equipment for largemouth bass fishing is typically the same. As the fish is on the heavier side, using an 8-weight would do the job. Using a disk drag will also help as it gives anglers a more gradual resistance in the line with a sinking leader. When preparing bait, both bass are receptive to the use of minnows, plugs, worms, and jerk bait. The difference between the two fish are in where they’re more likely to be found. Smallmouth bass are mostly found in open waters during warm temperatures while largemouth bass are mostly found in muddy waters, underneath fallen trees and weeds. 

Redear sunfish are one of the easier fish caught in Crow Creek and are more commonly used by anglers to practice using baits. What’s difficult in trying to catch the sunfish is trying to locate one. Redear sunfish are bottom-dwellers that swim around in vegetation. Most anglers let their flies sink into the bottom of the water before reeling it in for a few seconds until waiting for the fish to take the bait. Most anglers recommend the use of a  7-9 foot 5 weight rod with an 8-foot leader attached to 4 feet of 12 lbs mono. It is also recommended to use a size #6 or #8 flies like triangle bugs, poppers, or bucktails with the use of nightcrawlers, worms, and leeches as bait.

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Redear Sunfish

Habitat: Lake, River, Pond, Streams

Weight: 0 - 5 Pounds

Length: 6" - 17"

Smallmouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 27"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"