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Eastchester Bay

Bronx County, New York.

Eastchester Bay ends in Bronx, New York.

2220227.41 miles (3573110.77 sq kilometers)

About The Eastchester Bay

About Eastchester Bay, NY

Eastchester Bay is a body of water located between The Bronx and City Island in New York City. Although it’s called a bay, it is technically a sound as it opens to larger bodies of water at both ends. The bay is connected to the Hutchinson River and Pelham Bay via a small channel between Pelham Bay Park and City Island to the north. To its southern end, Eastchester drains to the East River and Little Neck Bay. On the eastern side, the bay opens to the Long Island Sound, which, in turn, connects the bay to the Atlantic Ocean. Because it’s mostly surrounded by landmass, Eastchester Bay is much calmer than the seas or oceans. Destructive waves, tsunamis, and storm surges are less likely to happen in its brackish water, which, of course, makes it an ideal place for ports and harbors.   

There are, however, no trade ports within Eastchester Bay. This is because larger commercial vessels will have a difficult time maneuvering in its relatively shallow water. There’s also the Cuban Ledge, a reef or islet made out of sand and rocks in the middle of the bay, making it nearly impossible for larger marine vessels not to run aground. Nevertheless, the bay is still one of the busiest bodies of water in the city as flat-bottomed barges are used to transport cargoes to and from Hutchinson River and The Long Island Sound. Furthermore, marinas and yacht clubs are scattered around the bay, particularly on the coasts of City Island and Country Club on mainland Bronx, which means that recreational vessels are a common sight on Eastchester Bay.

Eastchester Bay Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Eastchester Bay, NY

Given its connection to the Hutchinson River, East River, Long Island Sound, and the Atlantic, not to mention its proximity to the Hunter Island Marine Sanctuary, Eastchester Bay’s underwater ecosystem is wildly diverse. Fish species that can be found here include sea bass, weakfish, scup, bluefish, fluke, flounder, and pretty much any other fish you can find in the bodies of water connected to the bay. One of the most abundant fish species in the waters in and around Eastchester Bay is the striped bass. Not only are there plenty of stripers to catch here, but they can also even grow to impressive sizes, which, of course, make the fish a favorite target among the resident anglers of the Big Apple. However, even though there are numerous fish in the bay, it can be difficult to land one here. The combination of the shallow waters and the continuously traversing vessels on the surface makes the residents below get spooked easily.     

Fishing in Eastchester Bay can be done in several ways. For stripers, the best method is said to be trolling as you slowly navigate around the bay. You can also use different baits—from plugs, spoons, jigs, rigged baits, sandworms, and live ones. If you’re up for trolling the waters of Eastchester Bay, you can do so via fishing charters located at the City Island side of the bay. Another way to enjoy fishing around the bay is through surf casting, although you will have to make your way via a boat from City Island to the inlets, marshes, flats, rocky shores, and estuaries situated north of the bay as there are no surfcasting spots around Eastchester Bay. A conventional spinning rod with live, fresh-cut, or artificial bait is all you need to land some quality stripers.

If you’re planning on fishing the waters of Eastchester Bay, you will need to know the different city regulations (from size to possession limitations) for fishing in NYC. The authorities strictly enforce them. And, although a license is not required to fish in the saltwater around the area, you will still need to register through the Department of Environmental Conservation website.   

Eastchester Bay Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing the waters of Eastchester Bay and the surrounding waters (including Pelham Bay and Long Island Sound) is usually done between April and mid-December. That’s because stripers and other popular gamefish are not only abundant in the waters in and around Eastchester Bay, they can be legally fished as well. Other fish species such as bluefish, haddock, hickory shad, cobia, weakfish, on the other hand, are open all year round for catching.  

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing the waters of Eastchester Bay and the surrounding waters (including Pelham Bay and Long Island Sound) is usually done between April and mid-December. That’s because stripers and other popular gamefish are not only abundant in the waters in and around Eastchester Bay, they can be legally fished as well. Other fish species such as bluefish, haddock, hickory shad, cobia, weakfish, on the other hand, are open all year round for catching.  

Eastchester Bay Weather Forecast

Fri

79°F

Clouds

Highs

79

Feels 79

Winds

10mph

Humidity

62

03:19

05:43

Eastchester Bay Fish Species

All About Fishing in Eastchester Bay, NY

Given its connection to the Hutchinson River, East River, Long Island Sound, and the Atlantic, not to mention its proximity to the Hunter Island Marine Sanctuary, Eastchester Bay’s underwater ecosystem is wildly diverse. Fish species that can be found here include sea bass, weakfish, scup, bluefish, fluke, flounder, and pretty much any other fish you can find in the bodies of water connected to the bay. One of the most abundant fish species in the waters in and around Eastchester Bay is the striped bass. Not only are there plenty of stripers to catch here, but they can also even grow to impressive sizes, which, of course, make the fish a favorite target among the resident anglers of the Big Apple. However, even though there are numerous fish in the bay, it can be difficult to land one here. The combination of the shallow waters and the continuously traversing vessels on the surface makes the residents below get spooked easily.     

Fishing in Eastchester Bay can be done in several ways. For stripers, the best method is said to be trolling as you slowly navigate around the bay. You can also use different baits—from plugs, spoons, jigs, rigged baits, sandworms, and live ones. If you’re up for trolling the waters of Eastchester Bay, you can do so via fishing charters located at the City Island side of the bay. Another way to enjoy fishing around the bay is through surf casting, although you will have to make your way via a boat from City Island to the inlets, marshes, flats, rocky shores, and estuaries situated north of the bay as there are no surfcasting spots around Eastchester Bay. A conventional spinning rod with live, fresh-cut, or artificial bait is all you need to land some quality stripers.

If you’re planning on fishing the waters of Eastchester Bay, you will need to know the different city regulations (from size to possession limitations) for fishing in NYC. The authorities strictly enforce them. And, although a license is not required to fish in the saltwater around the area, you will still need to register through the Department of Environmental Conservation website.   

White Weakfish

Habitat: Offshore, Nearshore, Coral Reefs, Estuaries, Bays, Kelp Forests

Weight: 7 - 88 Pounds

Length: 28" - 65"

Scup

Habitat: Onshore, Nearshore, Reef

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 10" - 18"

Sea Bass

Habitat: Onshore, Nearshore, Offshore, Reef, Wreck

Weight: 2 - 9 Pounds

Length: 10" - 26"

Bluefish

Habitat: Nearshore, Onshore

Weight: 3 - 15 Pounds

Length: 15" - 51"