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Finney Creek

Skagit County, Washington.

Finney Creek midpoint in Sedro Woolley, Washington.

Finney Creek ends in Hamilton, Washington.

121 feet (37 meters)

25.54 miles long (41.10 kilometers)

12639440.10 miles (20341213.39 sq kilometers)

About The Finney Creek

Finney Creek is a River located in Skagit County, WA. Starting in Sedro Woolley, WA the Finney Creek flows 26 miles through Sedro Woolley, WA before ending in Hamilton, WA. The Finney Creek rises to an elevation of 121 feet and has a surface area of 7,853,783 square miles. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

 

About Finney Creek, WA

Finney Creek is a stream situated in Skagit County in Washington, United States, about 18 miles away from Sedro-Woolley with proximity to Birdsview. Finney Creek is a large river known for camping, whitewater rafting, and kayaking. The paddling sections in Finney Creek have also been a prime destination for its scenic campgrounds, as well as its picturesque natural view.

From the 1970s until the 1990s, multiple landslides from enormous sediment inputs in steep water terrain degraded some portions of Finney Creek, particularly its lower area. The resulting widened channels and riparian logging led to the domination of red alders and other hardwoods in the riparian community. Finney Creek also experiences warm temperatures in the summer, compromising the health of salmonids. As a resolution, the authorities responsible for facilitating the establishment of shade-tolerant conifer species along Finney Creek aimed to cut mature hardwoods to maximize the light available for conifers underplanted.

Finney Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Finney Creek, WA

Finney Creek is a tributary of the Skagit River, and it significantly influences the water quality and salmon community of the lower Skagit. It provides habitat for salmonid species, including Chinook, chum, coho, and pink. The lower gradient at the lower portion of Finney Creek supports anadromous spawning and rearing of salmon. It also houses trout species like steelhead, bull, rainbow, and cutthroat. The restoration efforts given by the authorities in Skagit have improved the plant communities in the area, resulting in thriving conifer species like spruce, cedar, hemlock, and grand fir, and to amphibians like rough-skinned newt and a long-toed salamander.

According to seasoned anglers, fly fishing is the most deployed fishing method in the area. Their recommended dry flies include Adams Dry Fly, Royal Wulff, Elk Hair Caddis, Blue Wing Olive, and Chernobyl Ant. They are also fond of using nymphs or wet flies and streamers, whichever is available. When you are targeting steelhead in the creek, make sure to get your fly-fishing gear and skill ready as steelhead fishing is challenging. You will need to have good casting skills and the knowledge of where to look for them. The wet fly swing technique is famous for trapping steelhead, wherein casting is done downstream and at a 45-degree angle across the river. The trick is to maintain your rod tip lower as your fly swings in the water and never lose the fly out of your sight as it proceeds towards the end of the run. The correct locations to catch steelhead in the water are usually the 3 to 6-feet depth range and areas where there is broken water.

Finney Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Plan your fishing getaway depending on what kind of fish you are targeting to catch. Salmon and steelhead fishing is productive in Finney Creek from August to November. July to September are the prime months for catching pink salmon, April to June for Chinook salmon, August to December for coho salmon, and October to December for chum salmon.

You may access Finney Creek from Sedro Wooley, turn left on South Skagit Highway, then right on Lower Finney Creek road. You will find the creek approximately 7 miles upstream from this road. But before you head out to enjoy the fishing adventure at Finney Creek, remember to secure your valid fishing license first. The permit is available through the website of the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Plan your fishing getaway depending on what kind of fish you are targeting to catch. Salmon and steelhead fishing is productive in Finney Creek from August to November. July to September are the prime months for catching pink salmon, April to June for Chinook salmon, August to December for coho salmon, and October to December for chum salmon.

You may access Finney Creek from Sedro Wooley, turn left on South Skagit Highway, then right on Lower Finney Creek road. You will find the creek approximately 7 miles upstream from this road. But before you head out to enjoy the fishing adventure at Finney Creek, remember to secure your valid fishing license first. The permit is available through the website of the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife.

Finney Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Finney Creek, WA

Finney Creek is a tributary of the Skagit River, and it significantly influences the water quality and salmon community of the lower Skagit. It provides habitat for salmonid species, including Chinook, chum, coho, and pink. The lower gradient at the lower portion of Finney Creek supports anadromous spawning and rearing of salmon. It also houses trout species like steelhead, bull, rainbow, and cutthroat. The restoration efforts given by the authorities in Skagit have improved the plant communities in the area, resulting in thriving conifer species like spruce, cedar, hemlock, and grand fir, and to amphibians like rough-skinned newt and a long-toed salamander.

According to seasoned anglers, fly fishing is the most deployed fishing method in the area. Their recommended dry flies include Adams Dry Fly, Royal Wulff, Elk Hair Caddis, Blue Wing Olive, and Chernobyl Ant. They are also fond of using nymphs or wet flies and streamers, whichever is available. When you are targeting steelhead in the creek, make sure to get your fly-fishing gear and skill ready as steelhead fishing is challenging. You will need to have good casting skills and the knowledge of where to look for them. The wet fly swing technique is famous for trapping steelhead, wherein casting is done downstream and at a 45-degree angle across the river. The trick is to maintain your rod tip lower as your fly swings in the water and never lose the fly out of your sight as it proceeds towards the end of the run. The correct locations to catch steelhead in the water are usually the 3 to 6-feet depth range and areas where there is broken water.

Chum Salmon

Habitat: Rivers, Nearshore, Offshore

Weight: 9 - 35 Pounds

Length: 24" - 42"

Chinook Salmon

Habitat: Onshore, Nearshore, River, Lake

Weight: 10 - 50 Pounds

Length: 30" - 59"

Coho Salmon

Habitat: Lake, River, Onshore, Nearshore

Weight: 8 - 12 Pounds

Length: 24" - 43"

Pink Salmon

Habitat: Onshore, Lake, River

Weight: 3 - 5 Pounds

Length: 20" - 30"