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Gator Bay Canal

Monroe County, Florida.

Gator Bay Canal ends in Chokoloskee, Florida.

2.30 miles long (3.70 kilometers)

About The Gator Bay Canal

About Gator Bay Canal, FL

Gator Bay Canal is a freshwater canal located in Monroe County. Beside the Canal are Big Boy Lake, Plate Creek, and Dads Bay. These water bodies have streams connecting to Gator Bay Canal, making it suitable for lilies, algae, and willow trees. The Canal got its name due to the frequent sightings of alligators back in the past. However, as Monroe County and its cities have developed rapidly, the locals have deemed it safe for outdoor recreational activities such as fishing, swimming, and kayaking.  

The Canal is among the many water bodies surrounding Monroe County and makes up 2,754 square miles of water under the county’s territory. Although most of the Canal in Monroe County and Florida is artificial, Gator Bay is a natural body of water and has freshwater. Thanks to the flowing streams from different lakes, creeks, and bays, the Canal can sustain freshwater supply and not take in too much saltwater.

Gator Bay Canal Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Gator Bay Canal, FL 

Anglers who want to access Gator Bay Canal can travel via Trail City and other connected water bodies. They can follow the road and take a boat ride towards the Canal. On the other hand, when accessing nearby water bodies such as Big Boy Lake or Plate Creek to get to Gator Bay Canal. The boat ride between Gator Bay Canal will be a sight to see. Its connected water bodies have beautiful tall trees along the banks and rock structures lying on the water. 

Anglers have also reported an abundance of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, and bluegill from the Gator Bay Canal. These fish often come from the connected water bodies and are quickly snatched up by bait or lures. Fishing in upstreams or sloughs is done by many anglers as these are the usual places where the fish group up to find food. 

Seagrass, lilies, and other leaf-floating plants also serve as home or shelter to fish of the Gator Bay Canal. Fishing in these spots can be rewarding. However, anglers should be cautious of alligators lingering around. It is best to paddle away from alligators instead of closing in to fish. Alligators also seek fish as food, so anglers should scout for alligators first if they find a school of fish lingering around. 

Gator Bay Canal Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Throughout the year, anglers have reported that from 4:00 am to 7:00 am, or as the sun starts to rise, the Canal has plenty of fish to offer. During this time, the waters of the Gator Bay Canal are well lit, and the fish are more visible underwater, even if they hide on plants. Schools of fish also find food during this time and give frequent bites to live baits set up by anglers. 

Later in the day or from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm, anglers can catch the fish as they move towards the connected water bodies. The fish prepare to move to the Canal’s nearby water bodies as the moon goes down. Fast water and currents are usually the go-to fishing spots during this time because this is where schools of fish are frequently swimming.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Throughout the year, anglers have reported that from 4:00 am to 7:00 am, or as the sun starts to rise, the Canal has plenty of fish to offer. During this time, the waters of the Gator Bay Canal are well lit, and the fish are more visible underwater, even if they hide on plants. Schools of fish also find food during this time and give frequent bites to live baits set up by anglers. 

Later in the day or from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm, anglers can catch the fish as they move towards the connected water bodies. The fish prepare to move to the Canal’s nearby water bodies as the moon goes down. Fast water and currents are usually the go-to fishing spots during this time because this is where schools of fish are frequently swimming.

Gator Bay Canal Fish Species

All About Fishing in Gator Bay Canal, FL 

Anglers who want to access Gator Bay Canal can travel via Trail City and other connected water bodies. They can follow the road and take a boat ride towards the Canal. On the other hand, when accessing nearby water bodies such as Big Boy Lake or Plate Creek to get to Gator Bay Canal. The boat ride between Gator Bay Canal will be a sight to see. Its connected water bodies have beautiful tall trees along the banks and rock structures lying on the water. 

Anglers have also reported an abundance of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, and bluegill from the Gator Bay Canal. These fish often come from the connected water bodies and are quickly snatched up by bait or lures. Fishing in upstreams or sloughs is done by many anglers as these are the usual places where the fish group up to find food. 

Seagrass, lilies, and other leaf-floating plants also serve as home or shelter to fish of the Gator Bay Canal. Fishing in these spots can be rewarding. However, anglers should be cautious of alligators lingering around. It is best to paddle away from alligators instead of closing in to fish. Alligators also seek fish as food, so anglers should scout for alligators first if they find a school of fish lingering around. 

Smallmouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 27"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"