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Hoosic River

Rensselaer County, New York.

Hoosic River midpoint in Petersburg, New York.

Hoosic River ends in Schaghticoke, New York.

66 feet (20 meters)

75.68 miles long (121.80 kilometers)

3509683.31 miles (5648289.53 sq kilometers)

About The Hoosic River

Hoosic River is a River located in Rensselaer County, NY. Starting in Berkshire, MA the Hoosic River flows 76 miles through Petersburg, NY before ending in Schaghticoke, NY. The Hoosic River rises to an elevation of 66 feet and has a surface area of 2,180,816 square miles. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

 

About Hoosic River, NY

The Hoosic River is a 76.3 mile-long stream in New York. It’s one of the tributaries of the Hudson River in the northeastern part of the country. Also sometimes referred to as Hoosac, the river’s name can mean either “the beyond place” due to being situated outside of Hudson, or “the stony place” as a reference to its stony bottom.

The Hoosic River is formed by streams coming from the Green Mountains of Vermont, the Taconic Mountains of New York, and the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts, that is why it is called a three-state river. This watershed is home to dozens of placid reservoirs, woody habitats, steep streams, bouldery runs, deep slow pools, and other features that make it a favorite recreational destination for anglers and non-anglers alike. It has two main branches: the South Branch and the North Branch. From south of Cheshire Reservoir where it originates, the Hoosic travels through communities, forests, and smaller tributaries until it reaches the community of Stillwater on the Hudson River. Its main tributaries include the Little Hoosic, the Owl Kill, the Little Hoosic River, the Green River, and the Tomhannock Reservoir.

Hoosic River Fishing Description

About Fishing in Hoosic River, NY

The Hoosic River is an excellent destination for trout fishing. In addition to its rich population of wild trout, the state also actively stocks its waters with rainbow and brown trout. But depending on your location, you can also catch largemouth bass, channel catfish, and white sucker in the watershed’s many rivers, streams, and lakes.

Trout species in the watershed prefer to stay in cold and clean waters where they get plenty of oxygen, so if you’re fishing in the Hoosic you’ll be better off dropping the line on shadowy, tree-covered tributaries. If you’re fishing in the South Branch, the most productive part is the water below Cheshire Reservoir. In Cheshire, you can use an old railroad bed as a guide as it follows the river up and downstream, and even intersects with it several times. The North Branch, which runs from Vermont to Massachusetts, gives access to the Bridges Pond Fish and Wildlife Access Area. For those who are on a quick fly fishing trip, there’s the Ashton Avenue Bride that provides immediate access to its stream. While fly fishing is the most common technique used by anglers on the Hoosic, the wide variety of water types here allows you to choose other methods like baitcasting and spinning.

Hoosic River Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

The Hoosic River offers a variety of fishing action all year round, no matter the season. If you’re in Massachusetts, the Cheshire Reservoir offers great fishing anytime. But if you’re planning to go, it’s highly recommended to familiarize yourself with the Hoosic rule. In summer, a large portion of the watershed gets warm enough to drive fish away, so the cold, oxygenated parts receive an increased fish activity. In the winter months, ice fishing is also allowed. Around January, you can drop a live bait in Tomhannock Reservoir and you’ll be rewarded with crappie, bluegill, or walleye. The states of New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont open the Trout season in April, while New York begins bass season sometime in June.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

The Hoosic River offers a variety of fishing action all year round, no matter the season. If you’re in Massachusetts, the Cheshire Reservoir offers great fishing anytime. But if you’re planning to go, it’s highly recommended to familiarize yourself with the Hoosic rule. In summer, a large portion of the watershed gets warm enough to drive fish away, so the cold, oxygenated parts receive an increased fish activity. In the winter months, ice fishing is also allowed. Around January, you can drop a live bait in Tomhannock Reservoir and you’ll be rewarded with crappie, bluegill, or walleye. The states of New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont open the Trout season in April, while New York begins bass season sometime in June.

Hoosic River Fish Species

About Fishing in Hoosic River, NY

The Hoosic River is an excellent destination for trout fishing. In addition to its rich population of wild trout, the state also actively stocks its waters with rainbow and brown trout. But depending on your location, you can also catch largemouth bass, channel catfish, and white sucker in the watershed’s many rivers, streams, and lakes.

Trout species in the watershed prefer to stay in cold and clean waters where they get plenty of oxygen, so if you’re fishing in the Hoosic you’ll be better off dropping the line on shadowy, tree-covered tributaries. If you’re fishing in the South Branch, the most productive part is the water below Cheshire Reservoir. In Cheshire, you can use an old railroad bed as a guide as it follows the river up and downstream, and even intersects with it several times. The North Branch, which runs from Vermont to Massachusetts, gives access to the Bridges Pond Fish and Wildlife Access Area. For those who are on a quick fly fishing trip, there’s the Ashton Avenue Bride that provides immediate access to its stream. While fly fishing is the most common technique used by anglers on the Hoosic, the wide variety of water types here allows you to choose other methods like baitcasting and spinning.

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Rainbow Trout

Habitat: River, Lake

Weight: 1 - 8 Pounds

Length: 16" - 34"

White Sucker

Habitat: Freshwater Rivers, Lakes, Streams

Weight: 2 - 8 Pounds

Length: 12" - 26"