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Turtle Bay

Charlotte County, Florida.

Turtle Bay ends in Placida, Florida.

3484301.44 miles (5607441.36 sq kilometers)

About The Turtle Bay

All About Turtle Bay, FL

Turtle Bay, FL is a saltwater bay that can be found in Charlotte County in Florida. It is near different bodies of water, such as Bull Bay, Gasparilla Sound, and Charlotte Harbor. Furthermore, it has a maximum depth of 10 feet. 

The bay got its name from the different species of turtles that flock here during the laying season. The terrain of the bay is very appropriate for these turtles since it has this big shallow part that allows them to move easily and go back to the water more conveniently.

Turtle Bay is divided into different parts, including the Main Entrance, Gallergers Cut, Eagles’ Nest, Eagles’ Nest Cut, and Sandbar. Many activities can be enjoyed in this place, such as nature trails and watching, swimming, and camping. Aside from that, you can also get a quick escape from the city lights by renting one of the beautiful hotels here and swimming in their outdoor pools, where you can enjoy the scenic view of the bay. 

Turtle Bay Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Turtle Bay, FL

Most parts of Turtle Bay are shallow, especially the large portion that is near the land. The saltwater here is supplied by the Gasparilla Sound flowing into Bull Bay and eventually into Turtle Bay. It is home to various fish species such as redfish, snook, albacore tuna, brook trout, chinook salmon, coho salmon, and mullet

Redfish like to hide in the bushes that can be found in the shallow parts of the bay. Besides that, they feed on small live animals such as marine worms, shrimps, and crabs. Given their diet, it is best to use the baitcasting technique using live shrimps or worms if you want to catch this particular fish. 

Baitcasting is also effective when catching a snook because they feed on small live animals. Their diet mainly consists of pinfish, small mullets, sardines, and greenbacks.

During winter, you may be able to catch the best trouts on the deeper portion of Turtle Bay near the Eagles’ Nest Cut. Trouts move to deeper pools during winter so they can get more cover to survive the cold. However, you must remember that their metabolism becomes much slower as the temperature goes down. At this time, they are likely to be less hungry and the fly fishing technique might not be effective in catching them. 

Given that Turtle Bay has an extensive shallow portion, inshore fishing is widely practiced by anglers who are flocking in here. Getting into the bay is quite tricky, and it will require you to use a motorboat. However, it will be helpful to keep in mind that the main entrance is a slow-speed manatee zone.

Turtle Bay Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Redfish is one of the most common catches in Turtle Bay. They are an all-year-round fish, but they usually spawn from August to November, making them a viable catch during these months. Snook, which is another common catch in this bay, has its closed seasons. They usually protect this fish species from May to September; this means that you can only catch them once they open their season. Trouts can be caught all year round, but as mentioned above, you can catch the best ones during winter. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Redfish is one of the most common catches in Turtle Bay. They are an all-year-round fish, but they usually spawn from August to November, making them a viable catch during these months. Snook, which is another common catch in this bay, has its closed seasons. They usually protect this fish species from May to September; this means that you can only catch them once they open their season. Trouts can be caught all year round, but as mentioned above, you can catch the best ones during winter. 

Turtle Bay Fish Species

All About Fishing in Turtle Bay, FL

Most parts of Turtle Bay are shallow, especially the large portion that is near the land. The saltwater here is supplied by the Gasparilla Sound flowing into Bull Bay and eventually into Turtle Bay. It is home to various fish species such as redfish, snook, albacore tuna, brook trout, chinook salmon, coho salmon, and mullet

Redfish like to hide in the bushes that can be found in the shallow parts of the bay. Besides that, they feed on small live animals such as marine worms, shrimps, and crabs. Given their diet, it is best to use the baitcasting technique using live shrimps or worms if you want to catch this particular fish. 

Baitcasting is also effective when catching a snook because they feed on small live animals. Their diet mainly consists of pinfish, small mullets, sardines, and greenbacks.

During winter, you may be able to catch the best trouts on the deeper portion of Turtle Bay near the Eagles’ Nest Cut. Trouts move to deeper pools during winter so they can get more cover to survive the cold. However, you must remember that their metabolism becomes much slower as the temperature goes down. At this time, they are likely to be less hungry and the fly fishing technique might not be effective in catching them. 

Given that Turtle Bay has an extensive shallow portion, inshore fishing is widely practiced by anglers who are flocking in here. Getting into the bay is quite tricky, and it will require you to use a motorboat. However, it will be helpful to keep in mind that the main entrance is a slow-speed manatee zone.

Redfish

Habitat: Onshore, Flats, Backcountry, Nearshore

Weight: 10 - 45 Pounds

Length: 30" - 61"

Brook Trout

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 10 Pounds

Length: 10" - 34"

Albacore Tuna

Habitat: Offshore

Weight: 20 - 45 Pounds

Length: 18" - 25"

Snook

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 12 - 29 Pounds

Length: 16" - 50"