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Alisal Creek

Monterey County, California.

Alisal Creek midpoint in Salinas, California.

Alisal Creek ends in Salinas, California.

39 feet (12 meters)

16.71 miles long (26.90 kilometers)

About The Alisal Creek

Alisal Creek is a River located in Monterey County, CA. Starting in Salinas, CA the Alisal Creek flows 17 miles through Salinas, CA before ending in Salinas, CA. The Alisal Creek rises to an elevation of 39 feet. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

 

All about Alisal Creek, CA

Alisal Creek is a short stream found in Monterey County. Classified as a watershed, the creek drains rainwater and flows its water to larger water bodies. It is part of the irrigation system found in Salinas City that flows in the river of the same name. Eventually, the water finds its way into Monterey Bay and into the Pacific Ocean.

The Salinas River runs at 175 miles, making it the longest Californian river found on the Central Coast. It begins in the southern part of the San Luis Obispo County, where it flows north into Monterey County, where it receives water from various tributaries including Alisal Creek. Other than an outflow for Monterey Bay, the river is an important source of irrigation for the farms and vineyards in the valley area.

Salinas City, where Alisal Creek flows through, was a land settled by the Esselen Native Americans and then by the Rumsen-Ohlones. Spanish missionaries were the first European immigrants to settle in the area where they were granted lands in order to preach. In 1848 California became part of the United States. The town flourished in the late 19th century because of the booming agricultural sector and the opening of the railroad. Trade further boomed when Chinese immigrants came and worked the fields, transforming the area from a marshy swampland into productive fields. At some point, Salinas City featured the 2nd largest Chinatown in the state, behind San Francisco.

Alisal Creek Fishing Description

Fishing in Alisal Creek, CA

Though less known compared to other major water bodies found in the area, the Alisal Creek can still offer anglers both new and experienced a fruitful fishing trip. As a watershed and tributary to the Salinas River, the creek has a varying number of fish to be caught in its water. These include the catfish (channel catfish, black and brown bullhead), bluegill, crappie, carp, and largemouth bass

Catfish are very common in the creek with species like the channel catfish, as well as brown and black bullheads swimming in the area. Anglers targeting catfish should take note of the fish’s hard mouth meaning hooks have a harder time latching on. Most anglers use big treble hooks that pierce deep enough so that they won’t get away. Catfish also do not have scales and instead secrete a mucus-like substance, making them very slippery. Anglers should be careful when holding them as their slippery body and sharp fins can cause cuts. When using bait, bullhead are receptive to the use of worms. Channel catfish in particular have a sensitive nose making bait like cheese and stinkbait very useful.  Anglers recommend the use of an extra-long rod of about 7” to 7.6” in length that can handle up to 5 lbs of weight.

For less-experienced anglers, bluegill, carp, and crappie are fish with a variety of ways to catch but can still provide some challenge or practice. All three can be enticed with a variety of bait including bread, worms, jigs, insects, minnows, and nymphs. Bluegill weigh only up to 2 lbs and are recommended for new anglers or those who wish to practice fly fishing techniques. Crappie are mostly active during dusk and dawn and can be found near fallen trees and bushes. They can be caught using either wet and dry flies and will most likely eat clouser minnows. The carp is the strongest of the three, and is the most popular game fish for anglers looking to test their strength. Carp can be fished using techniques such as fly fishing, sight fishing, and fish trolling. Anglers recommend the use of 7 to 10-weight rods depending on how heavy the carp is. When using hooks, the same principle applies. A #4 or #6 hook works well for 10-20 lbs fish, while the #8 or #10 hooks work well with those heavier than 20lbs.

Aside from the carp, largemouth bass are also popular game fish amongst anglers. They are found almost everywhere in the country in places like ditches and creeks, as well as warmer, muddy and shallow waters. Anglers should prepare heavier equipment as bass can provide a tough fight. Anglers tend to use a 6 or 8-weight depending on how heavy the bass is, while using disk drag. Baits such as minnows, worms, and hoppers work well. As the largemouth bass primarily live in muddy waters, the use of colorful streamers catch their attention the best.

Alisal Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality in Alisal Creek, CA

In Alisal Creek, there’s fish to go around all year long. Largemouth bass are best caught during early summer, right after their spawning season. Catfish are varied as channel catfish are best caught in colder months, during fall and winter, while fishing both black and brown bullhead are best done during warmer temperatures. Bluegill, crappie, and carp are all best caught during spring through early summer.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality in Alisal Creek, CA

In Alisal Creek, there’s fish to go around all year long. Largemouth bass are best caught during early summer, right after their spawning season. Catfish are varied as channel catfish are best caught in colder months, during fall and winter, while fishing both black and brown bullhead are best done during warmer temperatures. Bluegill, crappie, and carp are all best caught during spring through early summer.

Alisal Creek Fish Species

Fishing in Alisal Creek, CA

Though less known compared to other major water bodies found in the area, the Alisal Creek can still offer anglers both new and experienced a fruitful fishing trip. As a watershed and tributary to the Salinas River, the creek has a varying number of fish to be caught in its water. These include the catfish (channel catfish, black and brown bullhead), bluegill, crappie, carp, and largemouth bass

Catfish are very common in the creek with species like the channel catfish, as well as brown and black bullheads swimming in the area. Anglers targeting catfish should take note of the fish’s hard mouth meaning hooks have a harder time latching on. Most anglers use big treble hooks that pierce deep enough so that they won’t get away. Catfish also do not have scales and instead secrete a mucus-like substance, making them very slippery. Anglers should be careful when holding them as their slippery body and sharp fins can cause cuts. When using bait, bullhead are receptive to the use of worms. Channel catfish in particular have a sensitive nose making bait like cheese and stinkbait very useful.  Anglers recommend the use of an extra-long rod of about 7” to 7.6” in length that can handle up to 5 lbs of weight.

For less-experienced anglers, bluegill, carp, and crappie are fish with a variety of ways to catch but can still provide some challenge or practice. All three can be enticed with a variety of bait including bread, worms, jigs, insects, minnows, and nymphs. Bluegill weigh only up to 2 lbs and are recommended for new anglers or those who wish to practice fly fishing techniques. Crappie are mostly active during dusk and dawn and can be found near fallen trees and bushes. They can be caught using either wet and dry flies and will most likely eat clouser minnows. The carp is the strongest of the three, and is the most popular game fish for anglers looking to test their strength. Carp can be fished using techniques such as fly fishing, sight fishing, and fish trolling. Anglers recommend the use of 7 to 10-weight rods depending on how heavy the carp is. When using hooks, the same principle applies. A #4 or #6 hook works well for 10-20 lbs fish, while the #8 or #10 hooks work well with those heavier than 20lbs.

Aside from the carp, largemouth bass are also popular game fish amongst anglers. They are found almost everywhere in the country in places like ditches and creeks, as well as warmer, muddy and shallow waters. Anglers should prepare heavier equipment as bass can provide a tough fight. Anglers tend to use a 6 or 8-weight depending on how heavy the bass is, while using disk drag. Baits such as minnows, worms, and hoppers work well. As the largemouth bass primarily live in muddy waters, the use of colorful streamers catch their attention the best.

Brown Bullhead

Habitat: Lake, River, Backwater

Weight: 1 - 5 Pounds

Length: 8" - 22"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"