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Blackwater Sound

Monroe County, Florida.

Blackwater Sound ends in Key Largo, Florida.

19226088.24 miles (30941399.32 sq kilometers)

About The Blackwater Sound

About Blackwater Sound, FL

Blackwater Sound is a bay located in Monroe County, Florida, southwest of Jewfish and Cross Key. Found just 5.9 miles from Florida Keys’ longest island, Key Largo, this fishing area is near other bodies of water such as Little Buttonwood Sound, Tarpon Basin, Largo Sound, Lake Surprise, and Little Blackwater Sound. 

The aggressive development of the area surrounding Blackwater Sound started just fairly recently. It was after the appointment of Lillian Sexton as postmaster that the place really started to boom. The couple purchased land near the post office, which they developed to house a hotel and store. The area was consistently developed and became more habitable as Charles offered land clearing and dredging services. The area, which was then dubbed as the “Venice of the keys,” is now known as Sexton Cove.

Nowadays, visitors can enjoy a wide range of activities in the area, such as scuba diving, snorkeling, eco-tours, dolphin encounter programs, and - of course - fishing. 

Blackwater Sound Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Blackwater Sound, FL 

The bodies of water around Key Largo, including Blackwater Sound, is a mix of warm and nutrient-rich waters of the Caribbean Basin that move down into the Straits of Florida, as well as the waters of the shallow-water nurseries flowing from Everglades and Florida Bay. The result is a rich saltwater ecosystem that is home to a variety of fish. In Blackwater Sound, anglers may find mangrove snapper, spotted seatrout, bonefish, permit, great barracuda, tarpon, snook, and crevalle jack, among others.

Because of Blackwater Sound’s geography, it is only possible to do inshore fishing, which is perfect for when the winds are too strong for going offshore. There are a number of boat rentals within Key Largo as well as countless bait shops. Most of the fish can be caught with a variety of techniques such as fly, spin, and baitcast fishing. 

Blackwater Sound is the perfect destination for shallow-water anglers who are planning to try the elusive flat slams a try, which involves catching a bonefish, tarpon, and permit within the span of a day.  Bonefish are especially tricky to catch, which is why it is one of the most sought-after flats fish in the upper Keys. Even gentle movements like throwing a weighted bait into the water or the waves of a fly-line against the current is enough to make them hiding in deep water.  Attract these cautious fish with a piece of shrimp, clams, or conch.  Tarpon, on the other hand, often shake the hook by jumping in and out of the water until they successfully escape. Permit have a different style of breaking free; they go straight between mangrove roots, rocks, and snags to break your line, landing them the right to be part of the “flats slam.”  

Blackwater Sound Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

There are always fish that are available all year round in Blackwater Sound such as the mangrove snapper, great barracuda, and perch. Sometimes, anglers can even get a chance to catch small sharks. But if you’re aiming to complete the flats slam, the best time would be between the months of May and August. Though bonefish are available almost all throughout the year, they see a sharp decline in activity between January and February. Tarpon and permit activities often increase around March, with the tarpon activity slowing down by August, and the permit by November. During the colder and windier season, these fish tend to feed deep under the bay or along its edges. Anglers can also catch cobia from November to April, and Spanish mackerel from November to March.

Ensure that you get the most out of your trip to Blackwater Sound by checking the weather bulletin before planning your trip. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

There are always fish that are available all year round in Blackwater Sound such as the mangrove snapper, great barracuda, and perch. Sometimes, anglers can even get a chance to catch small sharks. But if you’re aiming to complete the flats slam, the best time would be between the months of May and August. Though bonefish are available almost all throughout the year, they see a sharp decline in activity between January and February. Tarpon and permit activities often increase around March, with the tarpon activity slowing down by August, and the permit by November. During the colder and windier season, these fish tend to feed deep under the bay or along its edges. Anglers can also catch cobia from November to April, and Spanish mackerel from November to March.

Ensure that you get the most out of your trip to Blackwater Sound by checking the weather bulletin before planning your trip. 

Blackwater Sound Fish Species

All About Fishing in Blackwater Sound, FL 

The bodies of water around Key Largo, including Blackwater Sound, is a mix of warm and nutrient-rich waters of the Caribbean Basin that move down into the Straits of Florida, as well as the waters of the shallow-water nurseries flowing from Everglades and Florida Bay. The result is a rich saltwater ecosystem that is home to a variety of fish. In Blackwater Sound, anglers may find mangrove snapper, spotted seatrout, bonefish, permit, great barracuda, tarpon, snook, and crevalle jack, among others.

Because of Blackwater Sound’s geography, it is only possible to do inshore fishing, which is perfect for when the winds are too strong for going offshore. There are a number of boat rentals within Key Largo as well as countless bait shops. Most of the fish can be caught with a variety of techniques such as fly, spin, and baitcast fishing. 

Blackwater Sound is the perfect destination for shallow-water anglers who are planning to try the elusive flat slams a try, which involves catching a bonefish, tarpon, and permit within the span of a day.  Bonefish are especially tricky to catch, which is why it is one of the most sought-after flats fish in the upper Keys. Even gentle movements like throwing a weighted bait into the water or the waves of a fly-line against the current is enough to make them hiding in deep water.  Attract these cautious fish with a piece of shrimp, clams, or conch.  Tarpon, on the other hand, often shake the hook by jumping in and out of the water until they successfully escape. Permit have a different style of breaking free; they go straight between mangrove roots, rocks, and snags to break your line, landing them the right to be part of the “flats slam.”  

Barracuda

Habitat: Nearshore, Offshore, Reef, Wreck

Weight: 5 - 15 Pounds

Length: 24" - 39"

Tarpon

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 25 - 63 Pounds

Length: 48" - 96"

Bonefish

Habitat: Onshore, Muddy Flats

Weight: 4 - 16 Pounds

Length: 16" - 41"

Permit

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Offshore, Reefs, Jetties

Weight: 9 - 60 Pounds

Length: 24" - 48"