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Coral Gables Canal

Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Coral Gables Canal ends in Miami, Florida.

3 feet (1 meters)

4.72 miles long (7.60 kilometers)

317063.87 miles (510264.99 sq kilometers)

About The Coral Gables Canal

About Coral Gables Canal, FL

Coral Gables Canal is located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The canal flows about 4.7 miles and has an elevation of 3 feet. It is connected to Lake Mahar and Entrada Channel, making it a good spot for fishing.

Coral Gables is the “American Venice” developed by famous real estate developer George Edgar Merrick. While Coral Gables is renowned for its canals and waterways, anglers can also visit one of the closest parks to Coral Gables Canal, the A.D. "Doug" Barnes Park. The park is a 65-acre green space where anyone can enjoy forest habitats, fish at a fishing lake, swim in a heated pool, jog in its jogging trails, spend time at picnic shelters, a vast playground where kids can play, and many more. Art enthusiasts can also do a quick visit to the Lowe Art Museum, showcasing ancient and baroque art to American art.

Coral Gables Canal Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Coral Gables Canal, FL

Anglers of all ages and skillsets will surely enjoy their fishing trip in Florida because of how the marine life in the state is. The fish found in Coral Gobles Canal include peacock cichlid, spotted tilapia, mayan cichlid, largemouth bass, midas cichlid, bluegill, common snook, and jaguar guapote. 

Peacock cichlid are omnivores, and they eat both meat and plants. They are commonly found in the bottom part of the canal, looking for food. Spotted tilapia are also omnivorous feeders and feast on a wide variety of food. Largemouth bass feed on fish, crayfish, and frogs, while the diet of mayan cichlid comprises small fish, shrimp, and insects. Aquatic and terrestrial insects are the favorite food of bluegill. Midas cichlid like to devour live and fresh food; common snook consume fish, shrimp, crabs, and zooplankton. Jaguar guapote are piscivorous eaters and mainly feed on smaller fish.

Coral Gables Canal has banks for inshore fishing. Baitcasting, fly fishing, and spinning are the fishing techniques wildly used by anglers while fishing in the canal. 

Anglers are advised to check the water, weather, and wind conditions in the area before going fishing. Anyone wishing to fish in Coral Gables Canal must review Florida’s fishing rules and regulations.

Coral Gables Canal Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Peacock cichlid can be caught all year and spawn every six weeks. Largemouth bass are also available year-round, but they are best caught during their spawning season, from mid-March through late May. Mayan cichlid are best caught during the spring and early summer months of May, June, and July. They spawn during May and June. The best months to go after bluegill are April until August, but their spawning season is late November through May. The best time to go after spotted tilapia is during their spawning season, around January to March and July to September. Midas cichlid are substrate spawners, and their reproduction phase occurs during the rainy season. Ideally, it is also the best time to catch them. Common snook loves warm waters, so the best time to fish for them is from spring to early fall. Snook spawning season takes place between April and October. The spawning season for jaguar guapote is from March to July. It is ideal for catching a guapote during warmer months as they tend to swim to the jungle during the wet season, making it more challenging for them to catch.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Peacock cichlid can be caught all year and spawn every six weeks. Largemouth bass are also available year-round, but they are best caught during their spawning season, from mid-March through late May. Mayan cichlid are best caught during the spring and early summer months of May, June, and July. They spawn during May and June. The best months to go after bluegill are April until August, but their spawning season is late November through May. The best time to go after spotted tilapia is during their spawning season, around January to March and July to September. Midas cichlid are substrate spawners, and their reproduction phase occurs during the rainy season. Ideally, it is also the best time to catch them. Common snook loves warm waters, so the best time to fish for them is from spring to early fall. Snook spawning season takes place between April and October. The spawning season for jaguar guapote is from March to July. It is ideal for catching a guapote during warmer months as they tend to swim to the jungle during the wet season, making it more challenging for them to catch.

Coral Gables Canal Fish Species

All About Fishing in Coral Gables Canal, FL

Anglers of all ages and skillsets will surely enjoy their fishing trip in Florida because of how the marine life in the state is. The fish found in Coral Gobles Canal include peacock cichlid, spotted tilapia, mayan cichlid, largemouth bass, midas cichlid, bluegill, common snook, and jaguar guapote. 

Peacock cichlid are omnivores, and they eat both meat and plants. They are commonly found in the bottom part of the canal, looking for food. Spotted tilapia are also omnivorous feeders and feast on a wide variety of food. Largemouth bass feed on fish, crayfish, and frogs, while the diet of mayan cichlid comprises small fish, shrimp, and insects. Aquatic and terrestrial insects are the favorite food of bluegill. Midas cichlid like to devour live and fresh food; common snook consume fish, shrimp, crabs, and zooplankton. Jaguar guapote are piscivorous eaters and mainly feed on smaller fish.

Coral Gables Canal has banks for inshore fishing. Baitcasting, fly fishing, and spinning are the fishing techniques wildly used by anglers while fishing in the canal. 

Anglers are advised to check the water, weather, and wind conditions in the area before going fishing. Anyone wishing to fish in Coral Gables Canal must review Florida’s fishing rules and regulations.

Mexican Mojarra

Habitat: Inshore, Coral Reefs, Ponds, Rivers, Lakes, Canals. Estuaries

Weight: 0 - 2 Pounds

Length: 3" - 15"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"

Snook

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 12 - 29 Pounds

Length: 16" - 50"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"