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Durbin Swamp

Duval County, Florida.

Durbin Swamp ends in Ponte Vedra, Florida.

20 feet (6 meters)

7.94 miles (12.77 sq kilometers)

About The Durbin Swamp

About Durbin Swamp, FL

Durbin Swamp is a freshwater swamp in Duval County, Florida, with an elevation of 20 feet and has a surface area of 4.9 miles. It is located west of the Intracoastal Waterway and east of St. John’s River and is covered by the Palm Valley. Other nearby water bodies include Powers Bay to the west, Tomolato River to the southeast, and Big Davis Creek to the northwest. The Durbin Swamp is part of the big natural land and wetland ecosystem space on the east side of Duval County.

Julington-Durbin Preserve resides near Durbin Swamp, where people can do many other recreational activities like hiking, horseback riding, picnicking, bicycling, fishing, jogging, and nature study. Some wildlife found in the preserve area includes tortoise, bald eagle, osprey, deer, bobcat, turkey, and birds like various species of wading and songbirds. It is a perfect place to visit, whether alone or with family and friends. Other nearby parks for people to see are Guana River Wildlife Management Area, Davis Park, Nocatee Preserve, Marsh Landing Country Club, and Pablo Creek Club.

Durbin Swamp Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Durbin Swamp, FL

Some might find it unusual to fish in Durbin Swamp and opt for other nearby fishing spots such as Stinson Park, Dutton Island Preserve, Castaway Island Preserve, Jacksonville Beach Pier, and Nassau Sound Fishing Bridge. Local anglers in Duval County must have already tried fishing the swamp out. Like many other swamps, the swamp is an excellent nursery for growing fish species. Almost all swamp species eat crayfish and small crabs, including adult fish. Many trees and shrubs contribute to fish species' environmental habitat by providing shade and cover. These species are redfish, black drum, sea trout, bluegill, channel catfish, largemouth bass, and crappie. The swamp is an area primarily for spawning fish and a good place to catch some adult game.

Worms, crayfish, leeches, crickets, and grasshoppers are suitable substitutes for freshwater fishing for anglers that cannot find enough live mullets or minnows as lures to take with them. Catfish and crappie even bite on lures such as fish cut into pieces. Scale the fish but leave the skin on.

Durbin Swamp Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

September has the highest average precipitation in Durbin Swamp, while November gets the lowest average rainfall. The coldest month in the swamp is in January, where the average temperature is 45.6 degrees Fahrenheit, and the hottest month is in July, where the average temperature is 89.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Anglers would find the swamp’s weather conditions tolerable and friendly, as the summers are more temperate in this area of Florida. Although, it still helps to be prepared with hats and enough refreshments.

Because Durbin Swamp is a freshwater swamp, freshwater fish species like largemouth bass, sea trout, and channel catfish can be found in the marsh at different times of the year.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

September has the highest average precipitation in Durbin Swamp, while November gets the lowest average rainfall. The coldest month in the swamp is in January, where the average temperature is 45.6 degrees Fahrenheit, and the hottest month is in July, where the average temperature is 89.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Anglers would find the swamp’s weather conditions tolerable and friendly, as the summers are more temperate in this area of Florida. Although, it still helps to be prepared with hats and enough refreshments.

Because Durbin Swamp is a freshwater swamp, freshwater fish species like largemouth bass, sea trout, and channel catfish can be found in the marsh at different times of the year.

Durbin Swamp Fish Species

All About Fishing in Durbin Swamp, FL

Some might find it unusual to fish in Durbin Swamp and opt for other nearby fishing spots such as Stinson Park, Dutton Island Preserve, Castaway Island Preserve, Jacksonville Beach Pier, and Nassau Sound Fishing Bridge. Local anglers in Duval County must have already tried fishing the swamp out. Like many other swamps, the swamp is an excellent nursery for growing fish species. Almost all swamp species eat crayfish and small crabs, including adult fish. Many trees and shrubs contribute to fish species' environmental habitat by providing shade and cover. These species are redfish, black drum, sea trout, bluegill, channel catfish, largemouth bass, and crappie. The swamp is an area primarily for spawning fish and a good place to catch some adult game.

Worms, crayfish, leeches, crickets, and grasshoppers are suitable substitutes for freshwater fishing for anglers that cannot find enough live mullets or minnows as lures to take with them. Catfish and crappie even bite on lures such as fish cut into pieces. Scale the fish but leave the skin on.

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Crappie

Habitat: River, Lake

Weight: 0 - 5 Pounds

Length: 4" - 19"

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"