Book Now

Piscassic River

Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

Piscassic River midpoint in Newfields, New Hampshire.

Piscassic River ends in Newmarket, New Hampshire.

23 feet (7 meters)

14.17 miles long (22.80 kilometers)

About The Piscassic River

About Piscassic River, NH

Piscassic River is a 15.3 mile tributary of the Lamprey River which also serves as a portion of the Piscataqua River watershed and the Great Bay, flowing right to the Atlantic Ocean. Found in the southeastern region of New Hampshire, specifically that of Rockingham County, the waterway rises right to Fremont’s northeastern region, followed by the marshlands of Epping and Newfields, eventually joining the Fresh River and the Lamprey River.

Through the years, New Hampshire’s Piscassic River was used for multiple reasons. For one, its lower region was used as a canal. A mule track was also built by its northwest bank. Furthermore, the river’s pond was also used to harvest ice, specifically throughout the 1900s. It is for this reason that a wooden icehouse was built right beside it.

Piscassic River Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Piscassic River, NH

While it is true that fish species such as the brook trout face certain degradation in the water body, there are still many portions of the Piscassic River that are very much protected and kept healthy. Because of this, the tributary with a wetland stream habitat is still filled with many thriving populations of fish species such as the redfin pickerel, largemouth bass, brook trout, and Pollock. On occasion, marine species such as the American eel, juvenile river herring, and juvenile sea lamprey, catfish, sunfish, pike, and white and yellow perch may be found as well.

In order to easily catch such fish, anglers may find that bait such as insects and minnows can work for redfin pickerel and largemouth bass, respectively. Meanwhile, they may find that for the Pollock, bait like herring, mackerel, and sprat will work best. The same could go for other marine species such as the juvenile river herring, juvenile sea lamprey, and American eel. On the other hand, when it comes to fishing techniques which are also essential to know when fishing, one may find jigging, spinning, baitcasting, and fly fishing as some of the best fishing techniques to be conducted in this river in order to catch such marine species.

Aside from that, it is also important for one to know that shore fishing may not be done in the area as the water body mainly offers offshore fishing; therefore, it is advisable that one uses a boat.

The main stem of the Piscassic River is the best place to fish, especially when one is specifically seeking redfin pickerel. The use of boats whilst fishing is also bound to impact fishing in a great way or help bring out a great recreational fishing experience.

Piscassic River Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Piscassic River is mainly home to warm water species. Due to this, the best choice to fish would be during the summer season, which specifically occurs from the months of June to September – a time when the temperature of the river is naturally warm, leading the many fish populations of the tributary to thrive. Aside from the season, it is also important to know the best time of the day when these fish are the most active, which would most likely be during the early morning.  

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Piscassic River is mainly home to warm water species. Due to this, the best choice to fish would be during the summer season, which specifically occurs from the months of June to September – a time when the temperature of the river is naturally warm, leading the many fish populations of the tributary to thrive. Aside from the season, it is also important to know the best time of the day when these fish are the most active, which would most likely be during the early morning.  

Piscassic River Fish Species

All About Fishing in Piscassic River, NH

While it is true that fish species such as the brook trout face certain degradation in the water body, there are still many portions of the Piscassic River that are very much protected and kept healthy. Because of this, the tributary with a wetland stream habitat is still filled with many thriving populations of fish species such as the redfin pickerel, largemouth bass, brook trout, and Pollock. On occasion, marine species such as the American eel, juvenile river herring, and juvenile sea lamprey, catfish, sunfish, pike, and white and yellow perch may be found as well.

In order to easily catch such fish, anglers may find that bait such as insects and minnows can work for redfin pickerel and largemouth bass, respectively. Meanwhile, they may find that for the Pollock, bait like herring, mackerel, and sprat will work best. The same could go for other marine species such as the juvenile river herring, juvenile sea lamprey, and American eel. On the other hand, when it comes to fishing techniques which are also essential to know when fishing, one may find jigging, spinning, baitcasting, and fly fishing as some of the best fishing techniques to be conducted in this river in order to catch such marine species.

Aside from that, it is also important for one to know that shore fishing may not be done in the area as the water body mainly offers offshore fishing; therefore, it is advisable that one uses a boat.

The main stem of the Piscassic River is the best place to fish, especially when one is specifically seeking redfin pickerel. The use of boats whilst fishing is also bound to impact fishing in a great way or help bring out a great recreational fishing experience.

Skipjack Shad

Habitat: Rivers, Dams, Wing Dikes

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 18"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Pollock

Habitat: Offshore, Nearshore

Weight: 20 - 35 Pounds

Length: 24" - 42"

Northern Pike

Habitat: Onshore

Weight: 2 - 34 Pounds

Length: 16" - 29"

American Eel

Habitat: Inland, Nearshore, Shallow Water

Weight: 8 - 17 Pounds

Length: 30" - 60"

Brook Trout

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 10 Pounds

Length: 10" - 34"