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Piscataqua River

Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

Piscataqua River midpoint in Kittery, Maine.

Piscataqua River ends in New Castle, New Hampshire.

13.17 miles long (21.20 kilometers)

About The Piscataqua River

Piscataqua River is a River located in Rockingham County, NH. Starting in Eliot, ME the Piscataqua River flows 13 miles through Kittery, ME before ending in New Castle, NH. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

 

About Piscataqua River, NH

Piscataqua River is a 19-km tidal watercourse that acts as a boundary between the states of New Hampshire and Maine. The river is one of the fastest flowing navigable waters in the world. It flows 12.25 miles through the towns of Eliot and Kittery in Maine and Newington, Dover, New Castle, and Rye down to the Gulf of Maine in Portsmouth Harbor in New Hampshire. The river’s portion in Maine to the north is primarily surrounded by residential properties, while the other half of it in New Hampshire is heavily industrialized. It has a drainage of about 1,495 square miles and its main stem begins at the confluence of Cocheco River and Salmon Falls River.

The river has given a lot of contributions to various industries throughout the years, from fisheries to shipbuilding. It is known for the powerful currents it produces, which affect the unique flora and fauna and the animal life that the river possesses. The river’s uses in the different industries also helped shape the region into a breeding ground of economic and biological importance. The area is popular now for recreational activities such as boating and wildlife viewing. It is also surrounded by bulk cargo docks, the state fish pier, tugboat operation, electrical generating facilities, and a petroleum distribution facility.

Piscataqua River Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Piscataqua River, NH

Piscataqua River used to be a home for plenty of marine life species such as oysters, clams, scallops, lobsters, mussels, seals, eels, sturgeon, and salmon. Evidence of these can be found in the river’s tributaries such as the Salmon Falls River, Sturgeon Creek, and Seal Rock. The river now provides great opportunities for fishing striped bass and bluefish, which are two of the most popular species to catch in the area. You may also find a good deal of pollock, Atlantic mackerel, brown trout, mackerel scad, and channel catfish here. The river also serves as a migratory highway for river herring and shad. You may also find populations of eel, tomcod, smelt, and flounder species here. 

Popular fishing techniques used here include baitcasting, fly fishing, surfcasting, and light tackle. Fishing in the river is mostly done by boat and open craft ranging from 18 to 22 feet are recommended here. Smaller boats may also be used if the weather is decent enough. Do remember that the currents here can be very strong, though, so it would be best to consider that before heading out here. While most schools of fish hang about on the surface of the water, it would be best to fish here while on the move.

You may have the best access to fishing here from the Goat Island Bridge, especially during night tides. Walking down the shorelines of both sides of the river during dusk or dawn is also ideal. You may also fish near the Bloody Point Road, wherein a short route will lead you to an outcropping that gives access to eddies caused by the tidal rip in that area. The Hilton Park at Dover Point is also a great access point to the river. 

Piscataqua River Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

The best times to fish in the Piscataqua River would be from 4 AM to 7 AM, 12 PM, and from 5 PM to 7 PM. It’s best to fish for striped bass here during the summer, generally from July to August, when the water gets calm and the fish get lazy. Fishing for stripers here can also be great in September. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

The best times to fish in the Piscataqua River would be from 4 AM to 7 AM, 12 PM, and from 5 PM to 7 PM. It’s best to fish for striped bass here during the summer, generally from July to August, when the water gets calm and the fish get lazy. Fishing for stripers here can also be great in September. 

Piscataqua River Fish Species

All About Fishing in Piscataqua River, NH

Piscataqua River used to be a home for plenty of marine life species such as oysters, clams, scallops, lobsters, mussels, seals, eels, sturgeon, and salmon. Evidence of these can be found in the river’s tributaries such as the Salmon Falls River, Sturgeon Creek, and Seal Rock. The river now provides great opportunities for fishing striped bass and bluefish, which are two of the most popular species to catch in the area. You may also find a good deal of pollock, Atlantic mackerel, brown trout, mackerel scad, and channel catfish here. The river also serves as a migratory highway for river herring and shad. You may also find populations of eel, tomcod, smelt, and flounder species here. 

Popular fishing techniques used here include baitcasting, fly fishing, surfcasting, and light tackle. Fishing in the river is mostly done by boat and open craft ranging from 18 to 22 feet are recommended here. Smaller boats may also be used if the weather is decent enough. Do remember that the currents here can be very strong, though, so it would be best to consider that before heading out here. While most schools of fish hang about on the surface of the water, it would be best to fish here while on the move.

You may have the best access to fishing here from the Goat Island Bridge, especially during night tides. Walking down the shorelines of both sides of the river during dusk or dawn is also ideal. You may also fish near the Bloody Point Road, wherein a short route will lead you to an outcropping that gives access to eddies caused by the tidal rip in that area. The Hilton Park at Dover Point is also a great access point to the river. 

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Striped Bass

Habitat: River, Lake, Onshore, Near shore

Weight: 10 - 81 Pounds

Length: 20" - 55"

Bluefish

Habitat: Nearshore, Onshore

Weight: 3 - 15 Pounds

Length: 15" - 51"

Pollock

Habitat: Offshore, Nearshore

Weight: 20 - 35 Pounds

Length: 24" - 42"