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Cabin Run

Clermont County, Ohio.

Cabin Run midpoint in Batavia, Ohio.

Cabin Run ends in Amelia, Ohio.

728 feet (222 meters)

4.16 miles long (6.70 kilometers)

About The Cabin Run

Cabin Run is a River located in Clermont County, OH. Starting in Batavia, OH the Cabin Run flows 4 miles through Batavia, OH before ending in Amelia, OH. The Cabin Run rises to an elevation of 728 feet. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

About Cabin Run OH

Cabin Run is a 4.5-mile stream that is over 200 meters in elevation located in Clermont County. It is near Monfort Heights and is 6.3 miles away from Creagar Airport. The stream is connected to Muskingum River, which is a tributary of the Ohio River and it flows to the East Fork Lake. Cabin Run is over 2 miles away from Cheviot, Hamilton County, near White Oak and it is one of Tohickon Creek’s tributaries. Nearby water bodies for Cabin Run are Cloverlick Creek, Bruce Creek, Dream Valley Lake, Shepherd Creek, Nina Lake, East Fork Lake and West Fork Mill. In the 1700s, there were a lot of stone homes and log cabins built in the area hence the name, Cabin Run. It was placed on the map as early as the 1770s. Back then, in order for the sawmills, leatherman grist, Loux grist, and cider mills to operate, the stream was used for its water velocity.

Cabin Run Fishing Description

About Fishing in Cabin Run, OH

In Cabin Run, the most leading number of caught fish are channel catfish, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass. Other fish species present and getting caught are hybrid striped bass, common carp, bigmouth buffalo fish, flathead catfish, black and white crappie, bluegill, and spotted bass. Such as the Cabin Run, areas that are surrounded by quite a lot of trees are known to have better vegetation and richer in nutrients. This attracts a wide variety of species to live here such as snakes, lizards, frogs, insects and fish. For channel catfish, crayfish, nightcrawlers, shrimp, stink bait, chicken livers and canned dog food has been an effective bait. Meanwhile, bass eat crayfish, snakes, insects, lizards, and smaller fishes.  The Cabin Run permeates through the forest carrying nutrients and small life forms towards a larger water body. These narrow and shallow streams balance the ecosystem from, through and towards various land and water bodies. 

For baits, using vibrating crankbaits, spinnerbaits, Texas-rigged plastic worms and tube baits are good for luring in fishes in this stream. 

When the temperature is about 60-70 degrees, use spinnerbaits or crankbaits for largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and spotted bass to easily lure them in. These are the conditions when the bass is aggressive and active.  

In the stream, focus on spots where the vegetation grows closer together, find holes and pockets on the edges or under a pile of weed patches and leafy areas. These are where fishes, especially bass, usually pile up and increase your chance in catching them. There is no need to bring a boat since the stream is shallow and narrow. In case you would want to bring a boat, the nearest docking area is at East Fork Lake. Otherwise, one can set up offshore and enjoy the land as well. The vegetation around the stream attracts fish, and other animals, to gather for the nutrients.

Cabin Run Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

When fishing it is best to know the temperature extremes. Cabin Run experiences its highest temperature of about 86 degrees in July, in contrast, it experiences its lowest temperature of about 21 degrees in January. It is recorded to have reached 90 degrees and stated to be one of the hottest areas of Ohio. For about 90 degrees, the fish species are affected and choose to move toward deeper places to cool their body. Since Cabin Run is a shallow stream, there might not be as much fish around. Under 50 degrees, the bass are inactive and move better in warm places. These are the months that have lower productivity for fishing. The ideal months to fish in are May, June and September for their perfect weather. Specifically, channel catfish start to be active around June. In general, fishing during early mornings is most recommended. For night fishing, it is best to target channel bends, ditches and drop off points.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

When fishing it is best to know the temperature extremes. Cabin Run experiences its highest temperature of about 86 degrees in July, in contrast, it experiences its lowest temperature of about 21 degrees in January. It is recorded to have reached 90 degrees and stated to be one of the hottest areas of Ohio. For about 90 degrees, the fish species are affected and choose to move toward deeper places to cool their body. Since Cabin Run is a shallow stream, there might not be as much fish around. Under 50 degrees, the bass are inactive and move better in warm places. These are the months that have lower productivity for fishing. The ideal months to fish in are May, June and September for their perfect weather. Specifically, channel catfish start to be active around June. In general, fishing during early mornings is most recommended. For night fishing, it is best to target channel bends, ditches and drop off points.

Cabin Run Fish Species

About Fishing in Cabin Run, OH

In Cabin Run, the most leading number of caught fish are channel catfish, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass. Other fish species present and getting caught are hybrid striped bass, common carp, bigmouth buffalo fish, flathead catfish, black and white crappie, bluegill, and spotted bass. Such as the Cabin Run, areas that are surrounded by quite a lot of trees are known to have better vegetation and richer in nutrients. This attracts a wide variety of species to live here such as snakes, lizards, frogs, insects and fish. For channel catfish, crayfish, nightcrawlers, shrimp, stink bait, chicken livers and canned dog food has been an effective bait. Meanwhile, bass eat crayfish, snakes, insects, lizards, and smaller fishes.  The Cabin Run permeates through the forest carrying nutrients and small life forms towards a larger water body. These narrow and shallow streams balance the ecosystem from, through and towards various land and water bodies. 

For baits, using vibrating crankbaits, spinnerbaits, Texas-rigged plastic worms and tube baits are good for luring in fishes in this stream. 

When the temperature is about 60-70 degrees, use spinnerbaits or crankbaits for largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and spotted bass to easily lure them in. These are the conditions when the bass is aggressive and active.  

In the stream, focus on spots where the vegetation grows closer together, find holes and pockets on the edges or under a pile of weed patches and leafy areas. These are where fishes, especially bass, usually pile up and increase your chance in catching them. There is no need to bring a boat since the stream is shallow and narrow. In case you would want to bring a boat, the nearest docking area is at East Fork Lake. Otherwise, one can set up offshore and enjoy the land as well. The vegetation around the stream attracts fish, and other animals, to gather for the nutrients.

Smallmouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 27"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Flathead Catfish

Habitat: River, Lake, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 4 - 60 Pounds

Length: 12" - 61"

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"