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Dyer Creek

Cumberland County, New Jersey.

Dyer Creek midpoint in Newport, New Jersey.

Dyer Creek ends in Newport, New Jersey.

8.26 miles long (13.30 kilometers)

About The Dyer Creek

About Dyer Creek, NJ

Dyer Creek or also known as Dyers Creek is a two-mile-long stream that is located in Cumberland County, New Jersey. It is near Dyer Cove and Gandys Beach and is only 8.4 miles away from Fairton. 

In 2012, Dyer Creek and its nearby communities and water bodies have been badly hit by Hurricane Sandy. Wind-driven waves caused the sand loss and a very important species of crab that visits its shores were affected. This species is the horseshoe crab. Horseshoe crabs pay a visit to the shore every once in a while to spawn and the waves caused by the hurricane were disturbing them from doing so. 

In order to create calmer waves for the horseshoe crabs, a group of volunteers and biologists, who worked alongside the Conserve Wildlife Foundation and American Littoral Society, built a near-shore oyster reef. The reef that they installed lessened the impact of the waves, reduced sand erosion, and created a habitat for marine living things at the same time.  

Dyer Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Dyer Creek, NJ

The water in Dyer Creek is mainly freshwater. It flows from the Padgetts Creek, going to the Dyer Cover before reaching the Dyer Creek. Anglers frequently visit this stream because of the abundant fish species that can be found there. 

The fish species that can be caught here include white perch, yellow perch, striped bass, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, bluegill, and crappie. Some fishing regulations must be observed, so be sure to check in with the New Jersey Fishing Rules and Regulations.

Baitcasting is the most effective fishing technique in catching a white perch and yellow perch. According to professional anglers, a hook sinker paired with a worm bait produces the best result. But, using lobworms, maggots, and prawns can work just as well. Perch also likes to feed in small packs, so if you are lucky, maybe you can get a bite from more than one. 

On the other hand, the smallmouth bass also likes baits. In fact, they love football jigs with a crawfish or grub so much.  Largemouth bass loves live baits. It is best to use minnows, shiners, shad, and crawfish in catching this specific fish species. Lastly, trolling is the best method in catching striped bass. You may troll a striper rig behind your boat or kayak if you are aiming to catch multiple fish at the same time.

Bluegill is also relatively easy to catch. This fish species is also fascinated with live baits. You may opt to use nightcrawlers, worms, crickets, grasshoppers, and mealworms. Pairing the baitcasting technique with a light tackle will surely get you a bluegill

Both inshore and offshore fishing are allowed in Dyer Creek. Again, make sure that you observe the fishing rules and regulations in the area. 

Dyer Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Perch is an all-year-round catch. In spring, which is from March through May, this fish moves out of deeper water to spawn as the temperature rises. While in summer, which is from June through August, they will be done spawning but a good number of them will stay in shallow waters for about two to three weeks. Next, in fall, which is from September through November, fishing for perch will become relatively easier because a school of them will move again to shallower waters as its temperature starts to go down. Lastly, during winter, which is from December through February, they will feed through the entire season and their taste will be so much better. 

The species of bass that can be caught here, can also be enjoyed throughout the year. Each season also poses different challenges. However, spring and fall, which are from March to May and from September to November, typically present the best action. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Perch is an all-year-round catch. In spring, which is from March through May, this fish moves out of deeper water to spawn as the temperature rises. While in summer, which is from June through August, they will be done spawning but a good number of them will stay in shallow waters for about two to three weeks. Next, in fall, which is from September through November, fishing for perch will become relatively easier because a school of them will move again to shallower waters as its temperature starts to go down. Lastly, during winter, which is from December through February, they will feed through the entire season and their taste will be so much better. 

The species of bass that can be caught here, can also be enjoyed throughout the year. Each season also poses different challenges. However, spring and fall, which are from March to May and from September to November, typically present the best action. 

Dyer Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Dyer Creek, NJ

The water in Dyer Creek is mainly freshwater. It flows from the Padgetts Creek, going to the Dyer Cover before reaching the Dyer Creek. Anglers frequently visit this stream because of the abundant fish species that can be found there. 

The fish species that can be caught here include white perch, yellow perch, striped bass, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, bluegill, and crappie. Some fishing regulations must be observed, so be sure to check in with the New Jersey Fishing Rules and Regulations.

Baitcasting is the most effective fishing technique in catching a white perch and yellow perch. According to professional anglers, a hook sinker paired with a worm bait produces the best result. But, using lobworms, maggots, and prawns can work just as well. Perch also likes to feed in small packs, so if you are lucky, maybe you can get a bite from more than one. 

On the other hand, the smallmouth bass also likes baits. In fact, they love football jigs with a crawfish or grub so much.  Largemouth bass loves live baits. It is best to use minnows, shiners, shad, and crawfish in catching this specific fish species. Lastly, trolling is the best method in catching striped bass. You may troll a striper rig behind your boat or kayak if you are aiming to catch multiple fish at the same time.

Bluegill is also relatively easy to catch. This fish species is also fascinated with live baits. You may opt to use nightcrawlers, worms, crickets, grasshoppers, and mealworms. Pairing the baitcasting technique with a light tackle will surely get you a bluegill

Both inshore and offshore fishing are allowed in Dyer Creek. Again, make sure that you observe the fishing rules and regulations in the area. 

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Striped Bass

Habitat: River, Lake, Onshore, Near shore

Weight: 10 - 81 Pounds

Length: 20" - 55"

White Perch

Habitat: inshore

Weight: 0 - 3 Pounds

Length: 7" - 19"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"