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Moultrie Creek

St. Johns County, Florida.

Moultrie Creek midpoint in Saint Augustine, Florida.

Moultrie Creek ends in Saint Augustine, Florida.

8.95 miles long (14.40 kilometers)

About The Moultrie Creek

About Moultrie Creek, FL

Moultrie Creek is located in St. Johns County, southeast of St. Augustine. Gen. John Moultrie, the English governor of Florida in 1777, inspired the creek's name. Because of its past community, it is regarded as a very historical site.

St. Johns County situates in the northeast part of Florida. It features relaxing scenery and a beautifully planned community. It was once voted one of the best places to live in the United States.

Moultrie Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Moultrie Creek, FL

The fish species that anglers can encounter in the historic Moultrie Creek include the largemouth bass, bluegill, redfish, and sea trout

The largemouth bass is considered native in most parts of North America. The adult largemouth bass eats frogs, crayfish, and fish, while the young largemouth bass eats crustaceans, insects, and smaller fish. This fish species is also a popular food source throughout the world and one of the top fish species for United States fish sports. If you're hunting a largemouth bass, keep in mind that they like to stay in spots where it is easier to hide, such as thick weeds and sunken objects. The most effective way to catch it is fishing with swim-baits and dragging. 

Bluegill has a body shape that reduces water resistance and enables it to swim fast. It usually feeds on small fish, snails, eggs, worms, and insects. This fish species is not selective in food because it also consumes crackers, corn, bread, and even human scraps. For those anglers who are eyeing to catch bluegill, here are several tips. It is highly effective to catch bluegill by spin fishing with worms. Jig fishing with small hooks is also a good strategy because bluegill has a small mouth. 

Redfish prefer to stay in shallow waters, bays, oyster reefs, coves, and lagoons. For anglers who like to catch one, keep in mind that this fish species is also considered as protected game fish, so there are some regulations to follow. Using prey as live bait is deemed one of the most effective techniques in catching redfish.

The sea trout is another fish species that you can spot in Moultrie Creek. The sea trout migrates from the sea to freshwater during its spawning season. It is known for its torpedo-shaped and elongated body. It is prevalent among commercial anglers because it is a common food source, usually processed and frozen. Most commercial anglers agree that using jerk baits, topwater plugs, plastic shrimp, spoons, and plastic tail grub jigs effectively catch sea trout

Aside from these four interesting fish species, Moultrie Creek is also home to sheepshead, crappie, flounder, and black drum. All types of anglers will surely enjoy visiting this water body. 

Moultrie Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Bass fishing in Florida is a year-round event. However, most anglers agree that the best time to catch a largemouth bass would be the months of March, April, and May. During these spring months, the bass feeds on its natural forage and gets back on its pre-spawning weight. You can easily spot bluegill from April to July. The best time to catch a redfish would be from September to November, while the best time to catch a sea trout would be during early summer. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Bass fishing in Florida is a year-round event. However, most anglers agree that the best time to catch a largemouth bass would be the months of March, April, and May. During these spring months, the bass feeds on its natural forage and gets back on its pre-spawning weight. You can easily spot bluegill from April to July. The best time to catch a redfish would be from September to November, while the best time to catch a sea trout would be during early summer. 

Moultrie Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Moultrie Creek, FL

The fish species that anglers can encounter in the historic Moultrie Creek include the largemouth bass, bluegill, redfish, and sea trout

The largemouth bass is considered native in most parts of North America. The adult largemouth bass eats frogs, crayfish, and fish, while the young largemouth bass eats crustaceans, insects, and smaller fish. This fish species is also a popular food source throughout the world and one of the top fish species for United States fish sports. If you're hunting a largemouth bass, keep in mind that they like to stay in spots where it is easier to hide, such as thick weeds and sunken objects. The most effective way to catch it is fishing with swim-baits and dragging. 

Bluegill has a body shape that reduces water resistance and enables it to swim fast. It usually feeds on small fish, snails, eggs, worms, and insects. This fish species is not selective in food because it also consumes crackers, corn, bread, and even human scraps. For those anglers who are eyeing to catch bluegill, here are several tips. It is highly effective to catch bluegill by spin fishing with worms. Jig fishing with small hooks is also a good strategy because bluegill has a small mouth. 

Redfish prefer to stay in shallow waters, bays, oyster reefs, coves, and lagoons. For anglers who like to catch one, keep in mind that this fish species is also considered as protected game fish, so there are some regulations to follow. Using prey as live bait is deemed one of the most effective techniques in catching redfish.

The sea trout is another fish species that you can spot in Moultrie Creek. The sea trout migrates from the sea to freshwater during its spawning season. It is known for its torpedo-shaped and elongated body. It is prevalent among commercial anglers because it is a common food source, usually processed and frozen. Most commercial anglers agree that using jerk baits, topwater plugs, plastic shrimp, spoons, and plastic tail grub jigs effectively catch sea trout

Aside from these four interesting fish species, Moultrie Creek is also home to sheepshead, crappie, flounder, and black drum. All types of anglers will surely enjoy visiting this water body. 

Redfish

Habitat: Onshore, Flats, Backcountry, Nearshore

Weight: 10 - 45 Pounds

Length: 30" - 61"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Sea Trout

Habitat: Inshore, Nearshore, Covered River

Weight: 1 - 6 Pounds

Length: 20" - 55"

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"