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Crooked Bayou

Plaquemines County, Louisiana.

Crooked Bayou ends in Braithwaite, Louisiana.

5.10 miles long (8.20 kilometers)

About The Crooked Bayou

About Crooked Bayou, LA

A freshwater bay with an elevation of about 1 meter (equivalent to 3 feet) above sea level, Crooked Bayou is situated within Plaquemines Parish, an administrative region equivalent to a county in Louisiana. Its name is derived from “piakmin”, an Atakapa word which when translated to English, means the parish’s famous local fruit persimmon.

Crooked Bayou is also found in the southwestern portion of Prea Park, the western region of Potash, northeastern region of an oil field to which it shares the same name with, Crooked Bayou Gas Field, and about 18.14 miles away from PointPointe à la Hache which also happens to be the closest populated town to the water body.

Crooked Bayou Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Crooked Bayou, LA

Crooked Bayou is rich in many different freshwater marine species. Such species that can be spotted in the Louisianan bay consist of big populations of largemouth bass, swordfish, yellowfin tuna, redfish, albacore, bonefish, mackerel, sailfish, American shad, brook trout, John dory, striped marlin, different salmon species (e.g. Chinook salmon, chum salmon, Coho salmon, sockeye salmon), mullet, and three-spined stickleback. Along with these species, one may also occasionally spot char there.

For baits, it all depends on the type of fish one is eyeing to catch. For instance swordfish and yellowfin tuna opt for bony fishes and squid. - On the other hand, redfish, albacore, bonefish, mackerel, and sailfish find small fish and crustaceans attractive; American shad, brook trout, John Dory, and striped marlin like to eat small fish; Chinook salmon and mullet find insects and crustaceans to be good; and finally, chum salmon, Coho salmon, sockeye salmon, the three-spined stickleback, and char all like small fish and insects.

The most effective and best fishing techniques to use Crooked Bayou are trolling, jigging, spinning, and fly fishing

Crooked Bayou Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in all the water bodies in Louisiana can be done all year round. This is the reason why seafood restaurants in the state are always packed with so much food. While this may be true though, spring is still hailed in the state as the best season to catch fish.

During spring, which typically lasts from March until May, fish seem to come in bigger numbers as they thrive more in warm temperatures. Aside from flourishing in numbers, fish appear in sizes that are quite bigger than their typical size during this season. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in all the water bodies in Louisiana can be done all year round. This is the reason why seafood restaurants in the state are always packed with so much food. While this may be true though, spring is still hailed in the state as the best season to catch fish.

During spring, which typically lasts from March until May, fish seem to come in bigger numbers as they thrive more in warm temperatures. Aside from flourishing in numbers, fish appear in sizes that are quite bigger than their typical size during this season. 

Crooked Bayou Fish Species

All About Fishing in Crooked Bayou, LA

Crooked Bayou is rich in many different freshwater marine species. Such species that can be spotted in the Louisianan bay consist of big populations of largemouth bass, swordfish, yellowfin tuna, redfish, albacore, bonefish, mackerel, sailfish, American shad, brook trout, John dory, striped marlin, different salmon species (e.g. Chinook salmon, chum salmon, Coho salmon, sockeye salmon), mullet, and three-spined stickleback. Along with these species, one may also occasionally spot char there.

For baits, it all depends on the type of fish one is eyeing to catch. For instance swordfish and yellowfin tuna opt for bony fishes and squid. - On the other hand, redfish, albacore, bonefish, mackerel, and sailfish find small fish and crustaceans attractive; American shad, brook trout, John Dory, and striped marlin like to eat small fish; Chinook salmon and mullet find insects and crustaceans to be good; and finally, chum salmon, Coho salmon, sockeye salmon, the three-spined stickleback, and char all like small fish and insects.

The most effective and best fishing techniques to use Crooked Bayou are trolling, jigging, spinning, and fly fishing

Bonefish

Habitat: Onshore, Muddy Flats

Weight: 4 - 16 Pounds

Length: 16" - 41"

Sockeye Salmon

Habitat: Inshore, Lake, River

Weight: 4 - 15 Pounds

Length: 18" - 32"

Chinook Salmon

Habitat: Onshore, Nearshore, River, Lake

Weight: 10 - 50 Pounds

Length: 30" - 59"

Albacore Tuna

Habitat: Offshore

Weight: 20 - 45 Pounds

Length: 18" - 25"