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Hen Run

Warren County, Ohio.

Hen Run midpoint in Maineville, Ohio.

Hen Run ends in Maineville, Ohio.

705 feet (215 meters)

5.28 miles long (8.50 kilometers)

About The Hen Run

Hen Run is a River located in Warren County, OH. Starting in Morrow, OH the Hen Run flows 5 miles through Maineville, OH before ending in Maineville, OH. The Hen Run rises to an elevation of 705 feet. Find maps, fishing guides, weather and recreation information at Guidesly.

About Hen Run, OH

Hen Run is a stream found in Warren County, Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, Midwest, US. The stream has an elevation of over 200 meters or 680 feet. Hen Run is located to the east of Loveland Park and Salt Run. Water bodies nearby Hen Run are the Little Miami River, Ertel Run, Grog Run, Bear Run, and Salt Run. Dams such as Rippe Pond, positioned 1.5km north, and Chitwood Pond Dam, positioned 2km northeast, are nearby Hen Run. The closest reservoirs to Hen Run are Rippe Pond and Chitwood Pond which are located north and northeast, respectively. At a certain point, Hen Run intersects with the Salt Run stream. Landmarks nearby are Maineville, Foster in the South, Murdock in the East, Shield’s Crossing and Loveland castle museum in the southwest of Hen Run. There are still hundreds of streams in Warren County, Ohio that remain unnamed. It has a similar name as the stream in Pennsylvania. 

Hen Run Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Hen Run, OH

Most common fishes caught in Hen Run are largemouth bass, channel catfish, bluegill, smallmouth bass, black and white crappie, American yellow perch, walleye, muskellunge, common carp, rainbow trout, bullhead, and brook trout. In streams, natural clogging happens when stones, branches and other debris block the pathway of the water. This causes a rise of water producing small waterfalls and providing spaces for fishes to hide. Because of the nutrients from both land and water, habitats in streams can easily thrive and depend on a mutual relationship thus, promising that fishes can reproduce and survive. These are between plants, fishes and other living organisms present. For catfish, bluegill, carp and bass, the use of frogs, fish guts, minnows and worms are good baits.

Seeing that Hen Run is a shallow stream, there is no need to bring a boat when fishing. One can simply set up camp offshore. For an ideal fishing spot, look for areas that are shallow, rocky and have a faster water current. If none is found, explore the stream and check on the undercuts, areas where the vegetation is rich and areas where the water current is reduced. These are where most fishes tend to hide and wait for food. When the water is warm, assume that you have a higher chance of catching walleye, catfish, bass, and carp. Using a live bait, drop shot is a good fishing technique in streams. This technique allows the bait to become more enticing due to the water current. Other fishing techniques, such as upstream fishing, can be easily applied as long as you are able to locate where the fishes are.

Hen Run Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

In Warren, Ohio, July is the hottest month reaching 85 degrees which is hotter than most areas. For catching a bluegill, having a temperature exceeding 70 degrees creates a greater chance to catch them in shallow water. The lowest temperature is felt in January. It reaches about 21 degrees. The most pleasing months are June, September, and August since it has the most stable weather. During these times, bass and crappie are most active which can cause higher productivity for anglers. Unlike during the first two months of the year, the weather is the least comfortable. It can be uncomfortable for the fish as well. Summer is the wettest season and it is harder to find catfish since they opt to go deeper. On the other hand, the driest season is Spring. If you are targeting a catfish, know that if the water is warm, catfish tend to go to shallow places. Try to avoid planning your fishing trip in May considering that it has the most rainy days.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

In Warren, Ohio, July is the hottest month reaching 85 degrees which is hotter than most areas. For catching a bluegill, having a temperature exceeding 70 degrees creates a greater chance to catch them in shallow water. The lowest temperature is felt in January. It reaches about 21 degrees. The most pleasing months are June, September, and August since it has the most stable weather. During these times, bass and crappie are most active which can cause higher productivity for anglers. Unlike during the first two months of the year, the weather is the least comfortable. It can be uncomfortable for the fish as well. Summer is the wettest season and it is harder to find catfish since they opt to go deeper. On the other hand, the driest season is Spring. If you are targeting a catfish, know that if the water is warm, catfish tend to go to shallow places. Try to avoid planning your fishing trip in May considering that it has the most rainy days.

Hen Run Fish Species

All About Fishing in Hen Run, OH

Most common fishes caught in Hen Run are largemouth bass, channel catfish, bluegill, smallmouth bass, black and white crappie, American yellow perch, walleye, muskellunge, common carp, rainbow trout, bullhead, and brook trout. In streams, natural clogging happens when stones, branches and other debris block the pathway of the water. This causes a rise of water producing small waterfalls and providing spaces for fishes to hide. Because of the nutrients from both land and water, habitats in streams can easily thrive and depend on a mutual relationship thus, promising that fishes can reproduce and survive. These are between plants, fishes and other living organisms present. For catfish, bluegill, carp and bass, the use of frogs, fish guts, minnows and worms are good baits.

Seeing that Hen Run is a shallow stream, there is no need to bring a boat when fishing. One can simply set up camp offshore. For an ideal fishing spot, look for areas that are shallow, rocky and have a faster water current. If none is found, explore the stream and check on the undercuts, areas where the vegetation is rich and areas where the water current is reduced. These are where most fishes tend to hide and wait for food. When the water is warm, assume that you have a higher chance of catching walleye, catfish, bass, and carp. Using a live bait, drop shot is a good fishing technique in streams. This technique allows the bait to become more enticing due to the water current. Other fishing techniques, such as upstream fishing, can be easily applied as long as you are able to locate where the fishes are.

Bluegill

Habitat: Lake, Pond, River

Weight: 1 - 2 Pounds

Length: 6" - 16"

Common Carp

Habitat: River, Lake, Backcountry

Weight: 5 - 100 Pounds

Length: 16" - 47"

Rainbow Trout

Habitat: River, Lake

Weight: 1 - 8 Pounds

Length: 16" - 34"

Smallmouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 27"