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The Everglades

Miami-Dade County, Florida.

The Everglades ends in Miami, Florida.

7 feet (2 meters)

0.50 miles (0.80 sq kilometers)

About The The Everglades

The Everglades, FL

The Everglades is the largest tropical wetland in North America, encompassing more than 1.5 million acres of ecosystem across central and south Florida. The route of water to the Everglades and ultimately to Florida Bay is one of a kind. Firstly, the water runs from Kissimmee River into Lake Okeechobee, overflowing in a very slow-moving manner until it reaches a so-called “river of grass” shallow sawgrass marsh region. It flows then through various habitats, including swamps, prairies, and mangroves, before making it to the Everglades National Park, an international treasure and notably protected area in Florida that sustains life for numerous endangered species.

As the largest wilderness in the Mississippi River, about 21 million people or one-third of the residents in Florida depend on the Everglades for water supply. This legendary wilderness is one of the world’s wonders, priding itself as the “Gateway to the 10,000 islands.”

However, the Everglades experienced significant damage due to environmental degradation and human development throughout the 20th century – severe drought and flooding, climate change, and the growth of urban areas. The authorities have implemented big-ticket restoration efforts to remedy the destruction created by this environmental tragedy, including the development of flood control devices, draining of Kissimmee River to preserve grazing land and agriculture, and different construction projects for water storage, to name a few. 

The Everglades Fishing Description

All About Fishing in the Everglades, FL

The Everglades sustains life for numerous overlapping ecosystems – sawgrass marshes and sloughs, small islands of trees such as the tropical hardwood hammock, pineland, cypresses, estuarine, and the marine habitats in Florida Bay. Given the mix of different ecosystems, the level of fish diversity is also very high. Depending on the area you fish, you may find some tarpon, warmouth, redfish, oscar, snook, sunfish, largemouth bass, black crappie, peacock bass, bluegill, chain pickerel, and Florida gar. And for added fun, you may go fishing while overlooking some alligators, exotic birds, amphibians, and mammals.

Both the saltwater and freshwater wetland portions of the Everglades accommodate recreational fishing opportunities. And considering how rich the biodiversity of this paradise is, lots of anglers recommend a fishing charter, available in Flamingo or the Keys. Professional anglers and boat owners could be a big help in guiding you on the specifics of fish access during different weather conditions and moon phases, saving more time to cover larger fishing areas. But if fishing solo is more like your jam, it is helpful to note that the most recommended technique in fishing at the Everglades is live bait fishing with a bobber. You may want to put the bobber over the pothole where fishes might be present and ensure its distance is a few lengths above the grass. The best baits for catching redfish are shrimp, crabs, and other small fishes. Just make sure that these baits are stuck to the bottom for the redfish to smell them and eat the hook.

Finding the perfect spot to fish is a common struggle. The good news is that fishing locations in the Everglades are already known to the resident fisher folks. Top of the list is the Ten Thousand Islands, where you can score tarpon, redfish, snook, and so many more with its several easy access regions nearby developed areas. And then the list continues to include Florida Bay, Snake Bight, Whitewater Bay, Holiday Park, Lake Okeechobee, Pine Glades Lake, West Lake, and Bear Lake. Flamingo is also a top fishing destination in the Everglades, requiring a boat to reach the miles of shallow water and grass flats. Most of the area in Flamingo disallow motor, and you can only use a pedal-powered boat and a paddle to go fishing.

The Everglades Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in the Everglades is accessible all year-round. But depending on the month, different species of fish are available to catch. October to March are the peak months for fishing in the Everglades. The rest of the year is good as well. However, storms might be a hindrance in reaching prime spots to fish.

Spring and summer are great seasons for sight fishing. And during winter and fall, you can still catch snook, redfish, and tarpon.

For accurate information on fishing open seasons and regulations in the Everglades, it is best to check the official Florida website for this matter. 

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in the Everglades is accessible all year-round. But depending on the month, different species of fish are available to catch. October to March are the peak months for fishing in the Everglades. The rest of the year is good as well. However, storms might be a hindrance in reaching prime spots to fish.

Spring and summer are great seasons for sight fishing. And during winter and fall, you can still catch snook, redfish, and tarpon.

For accurate information on fishing open seasons and regulations in the Everglades, it is best to check the official Florida website for this matter. 

The Everglades Fish Species

All About Fishing in the Everglades, FL

The Everglades sustains life for numerous overlapping ecosystems – sawgrass marshes and sloughs, small islands of trees such as the tropical hardwood hammock, pineland, cypresses, estuarine, and the marine habitats in Florida Bay. Given the mix of different ecosystems, the level of fish diversity is also very high. Depending on the area you fish, you may find some tarpon, warmouth, redfish, oscar, snook, sunfish, largemouth bass, black crappie, peacock bass, bluegill, chain pickerel, and Florida gar. And for added fun, you may go fishing while overlooking some alligators, exotic birds, amphibians, and mammals.

Both the saltwater and freshwater wetland portions of the Everglades accommodate recreational fishing opportunities. And considering how rich the biodiversity of this paradise is, lots of anglers recommend a fishing charter, available in Flamingo or the Keys. Professional anglers and boat owners could be a big help in guiding you on the specifics of fish access during different weather conditions and moon phases, saving more time to cover larger fishing areas. But if fishing solo is more like your jam, it is helpful to note that the most recommended technique in fishing at the Everglades is live bait fishing with a bobber. You may want to put the bobber over the pothole where fishes might be present and ensure its distance is a few lengths above the grass. The best baits for catching redfish are shrimp, crabs, and other small fishes. Just make sure that these baits are stuck to the bottom for the redfish to smell them and eat the hook.

Finding the perfect spot to fish is a common struggle. The good news is that fishing locations in the Everglades are already known to the resident fisher folks. Top of the list is the Ten Thousand Islands, where you can score tarpon, redfish, snook, and so many more with its several easy access regions nearby developed areas. And then the list continues to include Florida Bay, Snake Bight, Whitewater Bay, Holiday Park, Lake Okeechobee, Pine Glades Lake, West Lake, and Bear Lake. Flamingo is also a top fishing destination in the Everglades, requiring a boat to reach the miles of shallow water and grass flats. Most of the area in Flamingo disallow motor, and you can only use a pedal-powered boat and a paddle to go fishing.

Snook

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 12 - 29 Pounds

Length: 16" - 50"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Tarpon

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 25 - 63 Pounds

Length: 48" - 96"

Redfish

Habitat: Onshore, Flats, Backcountry, Nearshore

Weight: 10 - 45 Pounds

Length: 30" - 61"