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Find A Guide

Halifax River

Volusia County, Florida.

Halifax River midpoint in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Halifax River ends in New Smyrna Beach, Florida.

25.91 miles long (41.70 kilometers)

13191.25 miles (21229.27 sq kilometers)

About The Halifax River

About Halifax River, FL

Situated in northeast Volusia County, Florida, the Halifax River is part of the Intracoastal Waterway of the Atlantic. Running 25 miles long, Halifax River lies parallel with the Atlantic Coast shoreline, separating the Daytona beaches from its mainland. The Tomoka Basin serves as the source of the Halifax River and the Atlantic Ocean serves as its mouth. Just before connecting to the Atlantic Ocean, the river joins other tributaries like Spruce Creek and Mosquito Lagoon.

Originally, Halifax River was called the North Mosquito River but was later renamed after the 2nd Earl of Halifax during the British occupation period in Florida in the 17th century. The area’s first inhabitants were Native Americans who feed on fish and oysters from the river. The remaining shell mounds here were later used for building roads to pave the way to development.

Since the Halifax River runs through two cities, Daytona Beach and Ormond Beach, it offers a wide range of attractions for locals and visitors. Home to a diverse community of wading birds, waterfowl, and fish, wildlife viewing and fishing are highly sought-after in the area. Apart from these, numerous marinas and yacht clubs can be found here for boating.

Halifax River Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Halifax River, FL

The Eastern Coast of Florida is popular for rich, incredible inshore fishing, and Halifax River is no exception to this. The river and its tributaries provide anglers a wide fishing opportunity from different locations in the waters, such as mangrove marshes, seagrass beds, and channels. There are also plentiful harboring structures like docks, bridges, and rocks found within the area that are open for fishing.

With an average depth of 5 feet, the Halifax River is home to shallow-water dwellers such as redfish and speckled trout. These fish can be found year-round along the grass flats and mangrove marshes foraging for crustaceans and small fish baits. Most anglers target speckled trout by trolling, drifting, or wading, while some fly anglers find fly fishing for redfish rewarding. Head into the mouth of the river where plenty of them hang around.

Another shallow-water species that calls Halifax River its home is flounder. They can be caught by casting on the soft bottom or holes in the edges of channels, but jigging is found to be the most productive. Caught by jigging and baitcasting too are sheepshead and snook, but they frequent around structures like dock and bridge pilings that also hold crustaceans.

Your Florida fishing trip wouldn’t be complete without experiencing fishing for tarpon, also referred to as the “Silver King”. Many consider tarpon fishing the highlight of inshore fishing because of the challenge it brings. Big tarpon can jump several feet out of the water so this requires anglers to be properly geared up. A spinning tackle or fly gear may be used, but many find fly fishing exciting. Bright-colored flies are recommended so tarpon can easily spot your bait. 

Halifax River Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

With the temperate climate in Halifax River, most of the inshore species here are easily hooked year-round. As the spring approaches, the waters start bustling with redfish, speckled trout, and flounder. These fish can be found abundant until summer, and less during the cold months. Juvenile sheepshead remain inshore during summer too, but the larger ones migrate offshore to avoid the heat. For the hard-fighting tarpon, August is the best month but can be found as early as June. The snook start appearing around this month too, and they remain abundant even until winter where they are easily spotted in the shallow areas.

Halifax River Fishing Charters & Fishing Guides

address

Edgewater, FL

19ft - 3 guests

Starting as low as

$300

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

With the temperate climate in Halifax River, most of the inshore species here are easily hooked year-round. As the spring approaches, the waters start bustling with redfish, speckled trout, and flounder. These fish can be found abundant until summer, and less during the cold months. Juvenile sheepshead remain inshore during summer too, but the larger ones migrate offshore to avoid the heat. For the hard-fighting tarpon, August is the best month but can be found as early as June. The snook start appearing around this month too, and they remain abundant even until winter where they are easily spotted in the shallow areas.

Halifax River Weather Forecast

Fri

85°F

Clouds

Highs

85

Feels 88

Winds

5mph

Humidity

54

04:13

05:46

Halifax River Fish Species

All About Fishing in Halifax River, FL

The Eastern Coast of Florida is popular for rich, incredible inshore fishing, and Halifax River is no exception to this. The river and its tributaries provide anglers a wide fishing opportunity from different locations in the waters, such as mangrove marshes, seagrass beds, and channels. There are also plentiful harboring structures like docks, bridges, and rocks found within the area that are open for fishing.

With an average depth of 5 feet, the Halifax River is home to shallow-water dwellers such as redfish and speckled trout. These fish can be found year-round along the grass flats and mangrove marshes foraging for crustaceans and small fish baits. Most anglers target speckled trout by trolling, drifting, or wading, while some fly anglers find fly fishing for redfish rewarding. Head into the mouth of the river where plenty of them hang around.

Another shallow-water species that calls Halifax River its home is flounder. They can be caught by casting on the soft bottom or holes in the edges of channels, but jigging is found to be the most productive. Caught by jigging and baitcasting too are