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South New River Canal

Broward County, Florida.

South New River Canal ends in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

13 feet (4 meters)

25.60 miles long (41.20 kilometers)

15225371.39 miles (24502867.68 sq kilometers)

About The South New River Canal

About South New River Canal, FL

The South New River Canal originated from the New River in Florida. The New River is a tidal estuary located in South Florida. Despite its name, the New River is a channel that is composed of many tributary canals, one of which is the South New River Canal. The New River originates in the Everglades and continues a path going east. It then passes through Fort Lauderdale and continues to enter the Atlantic Ocean at Port Everglades. It then splits into three main canals at the Miami Canal. The North New River Canal, the South New River Canal, and lastly, another canal, which flows south of Sunrise Boulevard. The South New River canal connects to the Miami Canal and to the Dania Cutoff Canal, which leads eastward from the C-11 canal to the Intracoastal Waterway. 

The 15.7 miles long canal is one of the most shoreline-accessible waterways in south Florida which ranges from 50 to 120 feet in width. The South New River Canal is, on average, six feet deep except for the stretch near 148th avenue which is 12 feet deep. 

South New River Canal Fishing Description

All About Fishing in South New River Canal, FL

The variety of sportfish in the South New River Canal provides excellent fishing opportunities to both local and visiting anglers. One of these species is the butterfly peacock, which is a world-renowned game fish introduced by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in 1984. These species are at an average of 14.1 inches long and weigh around 1.9lbs, but 60% of these species grow and weigh more. Aside from butterfly peacock, largemouth bass, snook, and tarpon traverse these waters, which is considered to be a trifecta or a grand slam for local anglers. 

The fallen trees, canal intersections, dead ends, and culverts provide a thriving environment for these sportfish. In addition, the South New River Canal’s rich shoreline vegetation, riprap areas, and residential walls provide shade that these fish species need in order to survive. Anglers visiting this area can also land on some exotic species including oscar from South America and some Mayan cichlid from Central America. From time to time species like bowfin, chain pickerel, grass carp, and spotted gar can also be spotted in the South New River Canal.

One may traverse through the South New River Canal using a small boat or a canoe, although there are some culverts that are not accessible using a canoe. So, one must travel on foot to be able to fish in these areas. Landing on some fish in canals is quite basic. One just needs a simple rod and reel setup or a basic terminal tackle. Also, you will need a light fishing line, some floats, small hooks, and a landing net. However, one of the most popular and effective ways of fishing in canals is pole fishing. This is because it allows anglers to fish with a much lighter and delicate tackle than fishing with a rod and reel. This technique allows anglers to accurately place their bait in the same spot every time, plus it also allows an excellent bait presentation. 

South New River Canal Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in the south New River Canal is available year-round. One can book a trip anytime here and be sure to land on some of the species present. However, the most productive months would differ depending on the species you would want to target.

If you wish to land on some butterfly peacock, its most productive months would be from March through May. These species only feed during daylight. Thus, it would be best to schedule your fishing trip in the morning. Meanwhile, fishing for largemouth bass is best during the winters. These are the times when water temperatures are cooler. During these months, night fishing would be suggested. But, if you plan to visit during the summer months, early morning fishing would be best. Though these species are productive and are a great catch, anglers are encouraged to release most, if not all of the Butterfly Peacock, Largemouth Bass, Snook, and Tarpon they catch. As not releasing them may cause a deterioration of these high-quality fisheries.

Meanwhile, if you are lucky enough to land on the exotic oscar, Mayan cichlid, and spotted tilapia fishes, you may bring them home. While these are a delicious treat, these species are illegally released which poses a threat to native species.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Fishing in the south New River Canal is available year-round. One can book a trip anytime here and be sure to land on some of the species present. However, the most productive months would differ depending on the species you would want to target.

If you wish to land on some butterfly peacock, its most productive months would be from March through May. These species only feed during daylight. Thus, it would be best to schedule your fishing trip in the morning. Meanwhile, fishing for largemouth bass is best during the winters. These are the times when water temperatures are cooler. During these months, night fishing would be suggested. But, if you plan to visit during the summer months, early morning fishing would be best. Though these species are productive and are a great catch, anglers are encouraged to release most, if not all of the Butterfly Peacock, Largemouth Bass, Snook, and Tarpon they catch. As not releasing them may cause a deterioration of these high-quality fisheries.

Meanwhile, if you are lucky enough to land on the exotic oscar, Mayan cichlid, and spotted tilapia fishes, you may bring them home. While these are a delicious treat, these species are illegally released which poses a threat to native species.

South New River Canal Fish Species

All About Fishing in South New River Canal, FL

The variety of sportfish in the South New River Canal provides excellent fishing opportunities to both local and visiting anglers. One of these species is the butterfly peacock, which is a world-renowned game fish introduced by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in 1984. These species are at an average of 14.1 inches long and weigh around 1.9lbs, but 60% of these species grow and weigh more. Aside from butterfly peacock, largemouth bass, snook, and tarpon traverse these waters, which is considered to be a trifecta or a grand slam for local anglers. 

The fallen trees, canal intersections, dead ends, and culverts provide a thriving environment for these sportfish. In addition, the South New River Canal’s rich shoreline vegetation, riprap areas, and residential walls provide shade that these fish species need in order to survive. Anglers visiting this area can also land on some exotic species including oscar from South America and some Mayan cichlid from Central America. From time to time species like bowfin, chain pickerel, grass carp, and spotted gar can also be spotted in the South New River Canal.

One may traverse through the South New River Canal using a small boat or a canoe, although there are some culverts that are not accessible using a canoe. So, one must travel on foot to be able to fish in these areas. Landing on some fish in canals is quite basic. One just needs a simple rod and reel setup or a basic terminal tackle. Also, you will need a light fishing line, some floats, small hooks, and a landing net. However, one of the most popular and effective ways of fishing in canals is pole fishing. This is because it allows anglers to fish with a much lighter and delicate tackle than fishing with a rod and reel. This technique allows anglers to accurately place their bait in the same spot every time, plus it also allows an excellent bait presentation. 

Grass Carp

Habitat: Lake, River, Backcountry

Weight: 40 - 97 Pounds

Length: 16" - 59"

Chain Pickerel

Habitat: Lake, River, Pond, Bogs, Swamps

Weight: 3 - 5 Pounds

Length: 14" - 39"

Spotted Gar

Habitat: Creeks, Rivers, Lakes, Brackish Water

Weight: 4 - 6 Pounds

Length: 15" - 59"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"