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Depot Creek

Gulf County, Florida.

Depot Creek midpoint in Port Saint Joe, Florida.

Depot Creek ends in Apalachicola, Florida.

21.31 miles long (34.30 kilometers)

About The Depot Creek

About Depot Creek, FL

Depot Creek is located just 9.1 miles from Port Saint Joe in Gulf County, Florida. It flows 21 miles through Port Saint Joe and ends in Apalachicola. Depot Creek is named after Florida's first steam engine railroad line, formerly known as Columbus Bayou.

The Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Center, located near Depot Creek, provides interactive experiences for residents, visitors, and tourists interested in learning more about local sea turtles and their coastal ecosystems.

Those who want to visit Depot Creek can take the Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd via Knowles Ave and 10th Street or US Hwy 98 from Constitution Drive.

Depot Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Depot Creek, FL

Florida has a variety of fantastic fishing areas suitable for both amateurs and experienced anglers. The stream is commonly used to catch largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, redfish, and trout. Smallmouth bass feast on aquatic insects, planktons, and crayfish, while largemouth bass go after various species of fish, crayfish and frogs, crustaceans, insects, and other small fish.  Channel catfish are omnivores and mainly eat plants and animals. Trout are very active feeders that feed on insects found both inland and in the water. Crappie consumes small baitfish. Small baitfish and crustaceans are eaten by redfish.

Anglers generally use drift fishing, baitcasting, surfcasting, spinning, and fly fishing to catch trophy bass and other fish in the stream. Fishing for bass using dark-colored artificial worms, weedless lures, and live lures works perfectly. Traditionally, anglers use chicken livers when fishing for catfish, but basic lures such as spinners, soft plastics, and jigs can also be utilized. Anglers frequently use live baits when crappie fishing. Meanwhile, soft plastic lures can be used to catch both redfish and trout.

Anglers are encouraged to check with their local Fish and Wildlife department to ensure that the stream they intend to fish is open to the public. Licenses valid for one day, three days, or one year can be purchased at various locations throughout the county.

Depot Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Smallmouth and largemouth bass, along with channel catfish, can be caught throughout the year. Both smallmouth and largemouth bass spawn in the spring, from May to the middle of June. Channel catfish are best captured during summer. Catfish spawn in the late spring or early summer. They are most active at night but can also be seen during the day. Redfish are best caught during September, when they are at their peak. Crappie can be seized an hour before sunset during warmer months. They breed in late spring and early summer. The migration period of the seatrout from the sea to spawn in freshwater occurs during the spring and summer seasons. It usually starts in mid-April and lasts through the middle of September. Winter is the best time to catch trout.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Smallmouth and largemouth bass, along with channel catfish, can be caught throughout the year. Both smallmouth and largemouth bass spawn in the spring, from May to the middle of June. Channel catfish are best captured during summer. Catfish spawn in the late spring or early summer. They are most active at night but can also be seen during the day. Redfish are best caught during September, when they are at their peak. Crappie can be seized an hour before sunset during warmer months. They breed in late spring and early summer. The migration period of the seatrout from the sea to spawn in freshwater occurs during the spring and summer seasons. It usually starts in mid-April and lasts through the middle of September. Winter is the best time to catch trout.

Depot Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Depot Creek, FL

Florida has a variety of fantastic fishing areas suitable for both amateurs and experienced anglers. The stream is commonly used to catch largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, redfish, and trout. Smallmouth bass feast on aquatic insects, planktons, and crayfish, while largemouth bass go after various species of fish, crayfish and frogs, crustaceans, insects, and other small fish.  Channel catfish are omnivores and mainly eat plants and animals. Trout are very active feeders that feed on insects found both inland and in the water. Crappie consumes small baitfish. Small baitfish and crustaceans are eaten by redfish.

Anglers generally use drift fishing, baitcasting, surfcasting, spinning, and fly fishing to catch trophy bass and other fish in the stream. Fishing for bass using dark-colored artificial worms, weedless lures, and live lures works perfectly. Traditionally, anglers use chicken livers when fishing for catfish, but basic lures such as spinners, soft plastics, and jigs can also be utilized. Anglers frequently use live baits when crappie fishing. Meanwhile, soft plastic lures can be used to catch both redfish and trout.

Anglers are encouraged to check with their local Fish and Wildlife department to ensure that the stream they intend to fish is open to the public. Licenses valid for one day, three days, or one year can be purchased at various locations throughout the county.

Redfish

Habitat: Onshore, Flats, Backcountry, Nearshore

Weight: 10 - 45 Pounds

Length: 30" - 61"

Sea Trout

Habitat: Inshore, Nearshore, Covered River

Weight: 1 - 6 Pounds

Length: 20" - 55"

Channel Catfish

Habitat: Rivers, Tidal Mouths, Bends, Wrecks

Weight: 2 - 4 Pounds

Length: 15" - 25"

Smallmouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, River

Weight: 1 - 4 Pounds

Length: 12" - 27"