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Royal Galdes Canal

Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Royal Galdes Canal ends in Miami, Florida.

3 feet (1 meters)

2.55 miles long (4.10 kilometers)

124869.08 miles (200957.37 sq kilometers)

About The Royal Galdes Canal

Royal Galdes Canal is a Canal located in Miami-Dade County, FL. Starting in the Royal Galdes Canal flows 2.5 miles. The Royal Galdes Canal has an elevation of 3 feet. Find maps, fishing guides and recreation info at Guidesly.

About Royal Galdes Canal, FL

Royal Galdes Canal is a canal located in Miami-Dade County, northwest of North Miami Beach in Florida. It is sometimes known as the Royal Glades Canal and the Snake Creek Canal but some information also states that the Royal Galdes Canal is just a part of the Snake Creek C-9 Canal. The canal is known to be one of the first canals that dredged through the Everglades when Europeans settled in Florida. A saltwater lock was installed in the waterway in 1953, which converted the canal into a freshwater channel. It has an elevation of 1 meter. 

The canal starts its course at the South New River Canal, which is 5 miles west of Davie. It then extends to the south for about 7 miles, before turning eastward and then southeastward to connect with the Oleta River at North Miami Beach. It also flows into Skylake, which is a former rock quarry. The entire canal is situated in a slough area and is inadequate for the area it serves. The runoff in the area is significantly reduced by the obstructions of two highways and one railroad bridge at the lower end. The tidal action generally extends at least as far west as Red Road, especially during dry periods. 

The most popular activities done in the Royal Galdes Canal are kayaking, bird watching, and fishing. When you kayak along the canal in spring, you may see some beautiful cherry trees that are in bloom. There is also the Snake Creek Trail along the banks if you prefer to be out of the water while visiting the area.

Royal Galdes Canal Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Royal Galdes Canal, FL

Fishing in Royal Galdes Canal provides plenty of excellent opportunities for fishing peacock bass, largemouth bass, and Mayan cichlid, the most popular catches here. Other than that, you may also expect a good population of crevalle jack, spotted tilapia, common snook, walking catfish, black crappie, brown trout, bull trout, and chinook salmon. You may also encounter populations of rainbow trout, roach, and maybe ide species in the area.

Popular fishing techniques used here would be baitcasting and surf casting. You may access the water body through a kayak, or you can fish on the banks through the Snake Creek Trail. Do take note of the established rules and regulations before heading out into the area to avoid any problems when angling here. Whether you may be a resident or a visitor, you are required to have a Florida hunting, freshwater fishing, or saltwater fishing license when engaging in such activities within the state.

Fishing in Florida canals will guarantee much success if you are on the lookout for excessive vegetations along the edges of the canal, such as lily pads and algae. You may also check areas where there are sudden changes in structure, like corners, turns, docks, bridges, and even overhanging trees. Do take note, though, that most canals in Miami have a lot of anti-vegetation measures, so it’s best to be constantly on the move while angling here.

Royal Galdes Canal Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Florida canals are notorious for being reputable bass fishing locations, and they are called the fish paradise of the state. The Royal Galdes Canal, like all any other channels in the county, has fish species all-year-round, but the best months to go out here for bass fishing would probably be in January and February.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Florida canals are notorious for being reputable bass fishing locations, and they are called the fish paradise of the state. The Royal Galdes Canal, like all any other channels in the county, has fish species all-year-round, but the best months to go out here for bass fishing would probably be in January and February.

Royal Galdes Canal Fish Species

All About Fishing in Royal Galdes Canal, FL

Fishing in Royal Galdes Canal provides plenty of excellent opportunities for fishing peacock bass, largemouth bass, and Mayan cichlid, the most popular catches here. Other than that, you may also expect a good population of crevalle jack, spotted tilapia, common snook, walking catfish, black crappie, brown trout, bull trout, and chinook salmon. You may also encounter populations of rainbow trout, roach, and maybe ide species in the area.

Popular fishing techniques used here would be baitcasting and surf casting. You may access the water body through a kayak, or you can fish on the banks through the Snake Creek Trail. Do take note of the established rules and regulations before heading out into the area to avoid any problems when angling here. Whether you may be a resident or a visitor, you are required to have a Florida hunting, freshwater fishing, or saltwater fishing license when engaging in such activities within the state.

Fishing in Florida canals will guarantee much success if you are on the lookout for excessive vegetations along the edges of the canal, such as lily pads and algae. You may also check areas where there are sudden changes in structure, like corners, turns, docks, bridges, and even overhanging trees. Do take note, though, that most canals in Miami have a lot of anti-vegetation measures, so it’s best to be constantly on the move while angling here.

Peacock Bass

Habitat: River, Lake, Canal

Weight: 3 - 15 Pounds

Length: 10" - 29"

Largemouth Bass

Habitat: Lake, Pond, Rivers

Weight: 2 - 22 Pounds

Length: 15" - 32"

Mexican Mojarra

Habitat: Inshore, Coral Reefs, Ponds, Rivers, Lakes, Canals. Estuaries

Weight: 0 - 2 Pounds

Length: 3" - 15"

Crevalle Jack

Habitat: River, Onshore, Nearshore, Offshore, Reef, Flats Backcountry, Wreck

Weight: 15 - 60 Pounds

Length: 15" - 49"