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Georgia Fruit Farm Creek

Collier County, Florida.

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek midpoint in Marco Island, Florida.

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek ends in Marco Island, Florida.

2.49 miles long (4.00 kilometers)

224628.44 miles (361504.54 sq kilometers)

About The Georgia Fruit Farm Creek

About Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, FL

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek is a stream in Collier County in Florida, United States, located about 3 miles away from Marco, north of Caxambas and Rookery Island. Bodies of water nearby Georgia Fruit Farm Creek include Barfield Bay, Big Marco River, The Muddies, and Angelwing Creek. These streams and rivers offer the best fishing experience in Southwest Florida, featuring combined angling actions and wildlife spotting.

The authorities governing Florida water bodies have initiated projects to restore and protect ecosystems, natural resources, marine and wildlife habitats, and fisheries. As one of the initiatives, Florida anglers religiously practice the technique of catch and release. Catching and releasing appropriately addresses the increased fishing pressure and the degraded coastal and marine habitat. Florida has implemented several state and federal regulations to protect and sustain its fisheries. However, these rules apply if the fish that anglers release survive. 

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek Fishing Description

All About Fishing in Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, FL

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, including its neighboring water bodies, is rich in aquatic and wildlife species. Anglers have reported various fish caught, such as red drum, crevalle jack, snook, tarpon, trout, and sea catfish. The sustainable ecosystem in Southwest Florida streams and rivers allows numerous wildlife forms to flourish – manatees, sea turtles, bobcats, migratory birds, alligators, and panthers. The Marco Island, the Big Cypress National Preserve, the Everglades, and the Ten Thousand Islands, miles away from the Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, are the most iconic wildlife hotspots in Florida’s Paradise Coast. Gators, dolphins, egrets, shorebirds, herons, ospreys, deer, and otters are some of the best enjoyed during wildlife cruises and observatories.

Fishing in Georgia Fruit Farm Creek frequently reports red drum, caught through fly fishing and light tackle techniques. Most seasoned anglers and fly-fishing guides recommend an 8-weight set up for fly rods. It can manage to trap almost any species of fish. Fishing red drums can be challenging, especially for beginners, because of the fight they put up on their end of the line. But as long as you find the perfect spot, usually the calm portions of the water, and the correct bait that red drums cannot resist, mullet and shrimp, you have a high chance of catching one. For tarpon fishing, you may want to bring heavier braided tackle. Tarpon can break your line once hooked. Fresh live bait works well with tarpon, same with red drum. If you prefer to catch snook, bottom fishing should be your technique of choice. Successful snook fishing involved the use of pinfish, shrimp, sardines, and small mullets as baits. Make sure to use lures proportionate to the size of your hook, and beware of the sharp gill area of the snook. Cast as further as possible and reel in, crawling your rig across the bottom of the water to cover more area. 

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek Seasonal & Other Description

Fishing Seasonality

Summer and fall bring exciting opportunities in Southwest Florida fishing. Tarpon fishing is productive from March to June once tarpon makes their way to the nearby waters of Georgia Fruit Farm Creek to spawn. Snook spawn from May to October, allowing females to migrate nearshore. They cannot tolerate cold weather. Below 58 degrees are detrimental to them. You may find them along streams, in the shallow saltwater flats, and under the bridges.

Before you head out to experience Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, as well as the enormous fishing opportunities around it, make sure to secure valid fishing licenses first. Also, take note of the mandated species for catch and release and those that are illegal to sell and buy in Florida.

Temperature and Optimal Seasons

Fishing Seasonality

Summer and fall bring exciting opportunities in Southwest Florida fishing. Tarpon fishing is productive from March to June once tarpon makes their way to the nearby waters of Georgia Fruit Farm Creek to spawn. Snook spawn from May to October, allowing females to migrate nearshore. They cannot tolerate cold weather. Below 58 degrees are detrimental to them. You may find them along streams, in the shallow saltwater flats, and under the bridges.

Before you head out to experience Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, as well as the enormous fishing opportunities around it, make sure to secure valid fishing licenses first. Also, take note of the mandated species for catch and release and those that are illegal to sell and buy in Florida.

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek Fish Species

All About Fishing in Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, FL

Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, including its neighboring water bodies, is rich in aquatic and wildlife species. Anglers have reported various fish caught, such as red drum, crevalle jack, snook, tarpon, trout, and sea catfish. The sustainable ecosystem in Southwest Florida streams and rivers allows numerous wildlife forms to flourish – manatees, sea turtles, bobcats, migratory birds, alligators, and panthers. The Marco Island, the Big Cypress National Preserve, the Everglades, and the Ten Thousand Islands, miles away from the Georgia Fruit Farm Creek, are the most iconic wildlife hotspots in Florida’s Paradise Coast. Gators, dolphins, egrets, shorebirds, herons, ospreys, deer, and otters are some of the best enjoyed during wildlife cruises and observatories.

Fishing in Georgia Fruit Farm Creek frequently reports red drum, caught through fly fishing and light tackle techniques. Most seasoned anglers and fly-fishing guides recommend an 8-weight set up for fly rods. It can manage to trap almost any species of fish. Fishing red drums can be challenging, especially for beginners, because of the fight they put up on their end of the line. But as long as you find the perfect spot, usually the calm portions of the water, and the correct bait that red drums cannot resist, mullet and shrimp, you have a high chance of catching one. For tarpon fishing, you may want to bring heavier braided tackle. Tarpon can break your line once hooked. Fresh live bait works well with tarpon, same with red drum. If you prefer to catch snook, bottom fishing should be your technique of choice. Successful snook fishing involved the use of pinfish, shrimp, sardines, and small mullets as baits. Make sure to use lures proportionate to the size of your hook, and beware of the sharp gill area of the snook. Cast as further as possible and reel in, crawling your rig across the bottom of the water to cover more area. 

Tarpon

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 25 - 63 Pounds

Length: 48" - 96"

Crevalle Jack

Habitat: River, Onshore, Nearshore, Offshore, Reef, Flats Backcountry, Wreck

Weight: 15 - 60 Pounds

Length: 15" - 49"

Snook

Habitat: Inshore, Flats, Backcountry

Weight: 12 - 29 Pounds

Length: 16" - 50"

Redfish

Habitat: Onshore, Flats, Backcountry, Nearshore

Weight: 10 - 45 Pounds

Length: 30" - 61"